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  • Tuition Fee:
  • / Semester
  • Foreign: $ 16.3k / Semester
  • Languages of instruction:
  • English

    Photos of university / #suffolk_U

    Description

    Engineering, the application of science to design systems and structures, is a dynamic field with limitless growth potential. Boston is an engineering hub: The intellectual powerhouse of Kendall Square – home to a thriving start-up culture as well as offices of tech giants like Google and Yahoo– attracts top-tier engineering and biotech talent every year.

    Electrical engineers, who focus on circuits and currents, are the people who make your iPads, HD TVs, and smartphones. Notably, our program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, which ensures that your degree gets respect. As part of this approved curriculum, you’ll have the chance to focus on five key areas of specialization:

    • Analog Circuits
    • Digital Systems
    • Communications
    • Computer Engineering
    • Signal Processing

    Electric Power

    Our program also places an emphasis on power engineering. Smart grid, wind and solar energy, electric cars—all will change the way power is transmitted, distributed and utilized in the next decade. The pressing need to upgrade the country's aging power grid, coupled with projections that up to 50% of electric utility engineers will be eligible to retire in the next five years, means a stronger potential market for electrical engineers than ever before. To address these critical national needs, the Suffolk electrical engineering program has worked with our partners in the electric power industry to emphasize power concepts throughout our curriculum so that graduates of our program are ready to meet the challenges. As a result, we have students who are recipients of the IEEE Power and Energy Society Scholarships and intern in the electric power industry.

    Beyond the Classroom

    Electrical Engineering students take their knowledge beyond the classroom. They work one-on-one with professors on research projects, study abroad in locations as far away as Australia and Turkey, and test their skills in competitions with engineers from other colleges. There are several ways for students to get involved:

    • Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)

      Suffolk is home to a chapter of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), the field’s premier professional organization. IEEE also hosts the annual Micromouse Competition, at which individual students and teams compete to build the robot that navigates a maze the fastest. Suffolk students have enjoyed great success at the regional finals of this nationwide contest.

    • Technology and Science Initiative (TaSI)

      Suffolk students also benefit by participating in the Technology and Science Initiative (TaSI). TaSI gives undergraduates the chance to undertake cutting-edge research projects with Suffolk professors and industrial professionals.

      Recent TaSI projects

      • solar electric cell “parasol effect” thermal energy savings
      • solar electric-powered office
      • terranet: a student-friendly automatic data system
      • photo/light sensors
      • autonomous robotic delivery carrier
      • energy saving from high-efficiency windows
      • air temperature sensor
      • heat transfer in fish tanks
      • moisture in soil sensors
    • Study Abroad Engineering is a global profession involving multinational companies and quite often, teams from one nation will be working with teams from several others. It is vital for engineers to understand how culture affects how people prioritize and make decisions. Our study abroad programs give students the experience to understand the nuances and sensitivities needed to work successfully with engineers from abroad. Suffolk offers several study abroad options with Electrical Engineering courses taught in English:
      • Macquarie University, Australia
      • University of Newcastle, Australia
      • Aalborg University, Denmark
      • Yeditepe University, Turkey
      • Tecnologico de Monterrey, Mexico
      • Universidad Iberoamericana, Mexico
      • Pole Universitaire Leonard de Vinci, France
      • Institute Universitaire de Technologie de Marseilles, France
    • Senior Project

    Detailed Course Facts

    Application deadline February 15, 2015 Tuition fee
    • USD 16265 Semester (National)

    Full-time: 12-17 credits per semester $16,265

    Start date 2016 Credits 126 credits

    Students must complete a minimum of 126 credits for graduation.

    Duration full-time 48 months Languages Take an IELTS test
    • English
    Delivery mode On Campus Educational variant Full-time

    Course Content

    Major Requirements: 96 credits

    Requirements are divided into three basic categories:

    • Computer Science Requirement (4 hours)
    • Math and Basic Science Requirements (32 hours)
    • Engineering Requirements (61 hours)

    A listing of the required courses is provided below.

    All Electrical Engineering courses are accompanied by a laboratory. The analysis and design features of the laboratory exercises help to bridge the theoretical and practical aspects of electrical engineering. A competent engineer should be proficient in both areas.

    Within the engineering curriculum are two major course groups. The "ECE" courses (Electrical and Computer Engineering) have as their primary focus the electrical engineering field. The "ENS" courses (Engineering in Science) involve general topics.

    Upper-level courses in engineering depend heavily on foundation courses; therefore, a grade of “C” is required in all prerequisite courses in order to enroll in ECE required courses to maximize a student’s chances of success in mastering the material.

    Students are expected to take at least two elective courses in the EE field (either of ECE or ENS format).

    Engineering Topics (61 Credits)
    • ECE-101 Digital Electronics

      Prerequisites:

      ECE L101 MUST BE TAKEN CONCURRENTLY

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      This course introduces the elements and tools of digital design. The course covers Boolean algebra, Karnaugh maps, Logic gates and digital circuits, analysis and design of combinational and sequential circuits, and timing issues. Adders, decoders, multiplexers, flip-flops, counters, and registers are implemented using TTL or CMOS ICs as well as VHDL-programmed FPGAs. Formerly ECE 203

      Term:

      Offered Fall Term

    • ECE-L101 Digital Electronics-Lab

      Prerequisites:

      ECE 101 MUST BE TAKEN CONCURRENTLY.

      Credits:

      1.00

      Description:

      Illustrates the concepts of ECE-101. Exercises in various forms of Combinational and Sequential Logic design. Use of test equipment. Design projects will include a digital security system, use of PSPICE to verify feasibility of some designs. FPGA board citing Xilinx, software development tools from Xilinx and other third parties are introduced. Offered yearly. Formerly ECE L203

      Term:

      Offered Fall Term

    • ENS-103 Introduction to Engineering

      Prerequisites:

      ENS L103 MUST BE TAKEN CONCURRENTLY.

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      This course provides exposure to engineering practice, with particular focus on electrical engineering components such as circuit elements and systems. It seeks to go beyond the mathematics and provide an intuitive appreciation of functional devices. Examples taken from a broad swath of technological history illustrate significant crossroads, decisions, and inventiveness. Emphasis is placed on learning to think as an engineer - assessment of problems, candidate solution tradeoffs, and implementations. Frequent exercises in creative engineering design will be used. Students will be required to design several elementary devices, such as a magnet, a capacitor, a timing device, and a motor, which they will enter in a competition for overall strength, compactness, accuracy, or speed. Sometimes assignments relate to "survival on an island" concerns, such as communication or drinking water. Students also learn about reverse engineering by selecting, building, troubleshooting, and presenting an electronic kit of their choice. A term paper determining the engineering behind a topic of their choice will also be written and presented. On occasion (see ENS L103) there will be team competitions between various smaller groups in the class.

      Term:

      Offered Fall Term

      Type:

      SCI TECH ENGNR

    • ENS-L103 Intro to Engineering Lab

      Prerequisites:

      Must be taken Concurrently w/ ENS-103

      Credits:

      1.00

      Description:

      The Lab is designed to provide opportunities to gain familiarity with engineering tools. Students will be introduced to parts (e.g. learn the resistor color code), test equipment (multimeters, prototyping trainers, signal generators, and oscilloscopes), and construction techniques (wiring, soldering, troubleshooting). Although it varies from year to year, Class Projects can be built during the Lab sessions. In the past these have included a 25 Watt electric generator, various door lock systems (both mechanical and electronic), and an AM transmitter and receiver (all projects made from scratch). It is likely that 2010-2011 may introduce some robotic creations for a competition. Electronic kits and motors can also be built and serviced in the Lab. There is an adjoining machine shop, which can be utilized (with supervision), for fabricating items. Individual creativity is encouraged, and informal problem solving sessions occasionally occupy lab time. However, the lab is accessible outside of the traditional scheduled time.

      Term:

      Offered Fall Term

      Type:

      SCI TECH ENGNR

    • ECE-105 Circuit Theory I

      Prerequisites:

      ECE L105 must be taken concurrently; MATH 165 may be taken concurrently

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Basic elements and analysis techniques of DC circuits. Coverage includes resistors, capacitors, inductors, and sensors ; independent and dependent sources. Ohm's law, power, energy, and power transfer. Kirchoff's voltage and current laws; Nodal and Loop analyses; Thevenin and Norton equivalents; step and transient responses of first-order systems; time constants. Emphasis on functional circuits. Prerequisite: Must be taken concurrently with ECE L105. Must take MATH 121(must have a minimum grade of C in preqs.) 1 term - 3 credits.

      Term:

      Offered Spring Term

    • ECE-L105 Circuit Theory Lab I

      Prerequisites:

      ECE 105 must be taken concurrently

      Credits:

      1.00

      Description:

      The Circuit Theory Lab I is designed to supplement the Circuit Theory I course.

      Term:

      Offered Spring Term

    • ENS-L202 Technical Communication

      Prerequisites:

      WRI-102, PHYS 152 AND L152;

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      Emphasis on clarity, precision, accuracy, and conciseness in scientific writing. Assignments include a team-based design-contest proposal, an oral presentation on current scientific topics, a team-based design of an experiment with a write-up and an oral presentation, a paper on engineering ethics concerning the Challenger and an instruction manual. Memo writing, summary writing, and resumes are also included.

      Term:

      Offered Fall Term

    • ECE-205 Circuit Theory II

      Prerequisites:

      ECE 105 with C or better; MATH 166 & PHYS 152 concurrently

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Analysis and design of lumped networks. Resistive elements, superposition, nodal analysis, dependent sources, equivalence theorems. Energy storage in elements, dynamics of first and second order networks, transient responses, phasors, sinusoidal steady state analysis, steady state power analysis, three phase power circuits. Offered yearly.

      Term:

      Offered Fall Term

    • ECE-L205 Circuit Theory II Lab

      Prerequisites:

      ECE 205 MUST BE TAKEN CONCURRENTLY

      Credits:

      1.00

      Description:

      Illustrates the concepts of ECE 205. Simulations with PSPICE, LABVIEW, NXT Robotics, INCSYS Power Simulator, Mathematica; construction and design. First order, second order transients, ideal and non-ideal transformer circuits, sinusoidal steady state circuits, power grid simulation. Offered yearly.

      Term:

      Offered Fall Term

    • ECE-206 Solid State Devices and Circuits

      Prerequisites:

      ECE L206 must be taken concurrently; ECE 205(must have a minimum grade of C in preqs.)

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Review of Thevenin and Norton Equivalent circuits. Frequency Domain analysis and Bode Plots. Representation of an active device by its Gain, Input and Output Resistance. Thorough coverage of op amps - circuits, applications, and inherent limitations. Introduction to semiconductor physics and the PN junction. Diode circuits, applications, and models. Zener diodes and power supplies. Ripple estimations. The Bipolar Junction Transistor - large and small signal analyses. Active, cutoff, and saturation region characterization. Hybrid Pi and T models. Basic transistor configurations - common collector, common base, and common emitter - along with their characteristics, applications, and tradeoffs. Estimation of bandwidth using open circuit time constants. Prerequisite: ECE 205. Must have at least a C in this. Co-requisite: ECE L206

      Term:

      Offered Spring Term

    • ECE-L206 Solid State Devices & Circuits Lab

      Prerequisites:

      ECE 206 must be taken concurrently

      Credits:

      1.00

      Description:

      The Solid State Devices & Circuits Lab is designed to supplement the Solid State Devices & Circuits course.

      Term:

      Offered Spring Term

    • ECE-306 Solid State Devices, Power and Circuits

      Prerequisites:

      ECE-206 with a minimum grade of C. ECE L306 concurrently

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Continuation of Solid State Dev & Circuits I, with emphasis on MOSFET field effect transistors; Physical structure, I-V characteristics, modeling, use as a switch and CMOS inverter, biasing circuits, and basic amplifier configurations - common drain, common gate, and common source. Differential Amplifiers - BJT and MOSFET implementations, along with small and large signal analysis. Multistage circuits, active loads. Design of current source and current mirrors. Internal capacitance and high frequency limitations. Low midband, and high frequency analyses of transistor amplifiers. Miller effect. Open and Short Circuit Time Constants. Cascade and Cascode configurations. Frequency response of amplifiers. Significant circuit design activities. Course tightly coupled to ECE-L306.

      Term:

      Offered Fall Term

    • ECE-L306 Solid State Devices, Power and Circuits Lab

      Prerequisites:

      ECE 306 must be taken concurrently

      Credits:

      1.00

      Description:

      Illustrates the concepts of ECE 306. Exercises that help meld the practical aspects with the theoretical concepts taught in ECE 306. Biasing and design of MOSFET amplifiers. Construction of differential and multistage amplifiers. Investigation of different current source implementations. Simulation of bandwidth improvement using Cascode structures. Course concludes with a multistage design challenge using MOSFETs to reach a specified gain, output impedance and bandwidth objective provided by the instructor.

      Term:

      Offered Spring Term

    • ECE-325 Statistics for Engineering and Science

      Prerequisites:

      MATH 166 with a minimum grade of C; Must take ECE L325 concurrently

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Understanding the fundamentals of probability and statistics of experimental data. Measures of central tendency, variation, probability, events, Bayes Rule, discrete and continuous random variables, discrete and continuous distributions including the binomial distribution, normal distribution, chi-square distribution and student distribution, covariance, central limit theorem, hypothesis testing, linear regression, signal processing statistics (EE students), categorical data analysis (non-EE students). Use of Mathematica's statistical packages central to this course. Final project is a project with Biology measuring rat whisker resonance.

      Term:

      Offered Spring Term

    • ECE-L325 Statistics for Engineering and Science Lab

      Prerequisites:

      ECE L325 MUST BE TAKEN WITH ECE 325

      Credits:

      1.00

      Description:

      The Engineering Statistics and Probability lab is designed to supplement the Engineering Statistics and Probability course.

      Term:

      Offered Spring Term

    • ECE-403 Applied Electromagnetics

      Prerequisites:

      ECE 205 and MATH 265 with a minimum grade of C; ECE L403 must be taken concurrently

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Electrostatics and magnetostatics, including Coulomb's law, Gauss's law, Biot-Savart law and Ampere's law, vector operations in rectangular, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates, divergence theorem and Stokes theorem, electric fields in materials, Lorentz force, magnetic torque, Faraday's law, Maxwell's equation, wave propagation, transmission lines with Smith charts, rectangular waveguides, Hertzian dipole antenna; examples related to power when applicable.

      Term:

      Offered Spring Term

    • ECE-L403 Applied Electromagnetics Lab

      Prerequisites:

      Must be taken concurrently with ECE 403

      Credits:

      1.00

      Description:

      The Applied Electromagnetics Lab is designed to supplement the Applied Electromagnetics course.

      Term:

      Offered Spring Term

    • ECE-410 Communication Systems

      Prerequisites:

      ECE 206, ECE 225 and MATH 265 with a minimum grade of C; L410 concurrently

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Coverage of a variety of basic communication systems, their theory of operation, and the analysis of their performance. Review of linear systems, Fourier and Laplace Transforms, and Frequency Domain analysis as needed. Graphical convolution of analog signals. Digital Baseband modulation techniques. Receiver design with an introduction to Stochastics. Digital Bandpass modulation and demodulation techniques. Analog communication systems including AM, FM, and PM approaches. Consideration of Noise and the resultant system performance. Multiplexing and information compression. ECE 410 and ECE L410 must be taken concurrently.

    • ECE-L410 Communications Systems Lab

      Prerequisites:

      ECE 410 must be taken concurrently

      Credits:

      1.00

      Description:

      Illustrates the concepts of ECE 410. Exercises will focus both on communication system components and in the construction of a complete communication system. Introduction to FSK, DTMF, Phase lock loops, AM and FM modulation, oscillators, A/D and D/A conversion and the Nyquist rate. Wireless transmissions. Troubleshooting of non-working systems. Students have flexibility in the design and construction a full communication system which includes digitization, rearrangement in parallel and serial formats, transmission over a distance, and reconstruction back to its original analog form.

    • ECE-414 Senior Project Proposal

      Prerequisites:

      Take ECE-101, ECE-206, MATH-165;

      Credits:

      1.00

      Description:

      The aim of this course is for students to generate a thoughtful and well -written senior project proposal. This course will provide guidelines and critiquing for that purpose. By the end of the course, students will have narrowly identified their project, performed a review of current available related technology, and selected the approach they will pursue. They will also establish a parts list, timetable, set of milestones, and basis or procedure for determining an answer to the question how good is it? At the end of the course they will formally present their project and write a comprehensive project proposal document. Once accepted, they are permitted to take ENS 415 Senior Project. Note that this course is focused on the process of creating a viable proposal. Enough flexibility exists that students may either implement the project they documented in this course when they take ENS 415, or may pursue an alternative project if desired. Also note that this course replaces ECE 411 for the graduating class of 2016.

    • ECE-415 Senior Project

      Prerequisites:

      Take ECE-414;

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      For the senior project the student implements, documents, and presents their completed project of the proposal generated in ENS 414. Having defined their project, students gather the resources necessary and proceed to execute their designs. This period will include the construction, testing, troubleshooting, refinement, and evaluation of their project. A formal presentation of the project is made. A professional caliber documentation of the project is also required, and may go through numerous iterations of review. The final project report must consider most of the following: environmental impact, sustainability, manufacturability, ethics, health and safety issues, and political concerns. Time management, prioritization of process, formal communication, overcoming obstacles and meeting deadlines are monitored by the project advisor. Weekly reports and meetings are expected. The advisor also serves as a resource for the student. However, full responsibility for the success of the project rests on the student. Cross-disciplinary projects are encouraged. Note: Replaces ECE 412 for the graduating class of 2016.

      Type:

      Expanded Classroom Requirement

    • ECE-430 Digital Signal Processing

      Prerequisites:

      ECE 225, ECE 203 with minimum grade of C; ECE L430 concurrently

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Discrete signals and systems, digital simulation of analog systems, Z transforms, recursion equations, finite-order systems, Fourier transforms, line spectra and Fourier series, discrete Fourier series and Fast Fourier Transforms (FTT), sampling and interpolation, mean-square approximations, non-recursive and recursive filters, selected topics on algorithms, design and applications of digital signal processing. There will be an end-of-semester design project that will involve students' creativity, design of open ended projects, formulation of alternative solutions, detailed system description, realistic constraints (economic factors, safety, reliability, aesthetics ethics, and social impact).

      Term:

      Offered Fall Term

    • ECE-L430 Digital Signal Processing Lab

      Prerequisites:

      ECE 430 must be taken concurrently

      Credits:

      1.00

      Description:

      Illustrates the concepts of ECE 430. This laboratory course uses MATLAB, Simulink, and the Texas Instruments 6713 DPS board to design, test and implement various projects. The students will also learn how to use FPGA boards to design and implement various DSP systems. There will be a design project at the end of the course designed to synthesize what the students have learned.

      Term:

      Offered Fall Term

    • ECE-307 Electric Power Systems - Analysis and Design

      Prerequisites:

      MA166; ECE 205; ECE 206 and ECE 403 helpful, but not required

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      This course is a first course in understanding the components that compose the high power grid. Generation of power; transmission line characteristics, load impacts. Real and reactive power along with compensation techniques. Transformers. Synchronous generators and motors. Power flow. Power quality. Transient and dynamic stability issues. Handling faults, overvoltage and surge protection. Electronic control by high power devices such as thyristors, relays, and circuit breakers. HVDC examined. Recent developments and opportunities in the Power field. A strong emphasis placed on problems solving and representative exercises.

    Choose two ECE electives.

    Mathematics and Basic Science (32 credits)

    All courses must be taken with their corresponding laboratory class.

    • ENS-333 Programming for Engineers

      Prerequisites:

      ENS L333 concurrently

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      This course will introduce programming concepts in the context of solving engineering problems. Emphasis will be placed on applying the high-level programming skills learned to particular platforms such as embedded systems. Students will implement various microcontroller programming exercises as well as an end of the semester project.

      Term:

      Offered Spring Term

    • ENS-L333 Programming for Engineers Lab

      Prerequisites:

      ENS 333 concurrently

      Credits:

      1.00

      Description:

      The Programming for Engineers lab is designed to supplement the Programming for Engineers Course.

    • PHYS-151 University Physics I

      Prerequisites:

      Take MATH-121 or MATH 165. PHYS L151 concurrently

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Introduction to the fundamental principles of physics using calculus. The course includes the study of vectors, Newton's laws, rotations, rigid body statics and dynamics, simple harmonic motion, heat and temperature.

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

      Type:

      NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS,SCI TECH ENGNR

    • PHYS-L151 University Physics Lab I

      Prerequisites:

      PHYS 151 concurrently

      Credits:

      1.00

      Description:

      The laboratory consists of experiments to illustrate the basic concepts studied in the course: measurements, propagation of errors, vectors, Newton's laws, work and energy, momentum, rotations, oscillations, simple harmonic motion, fluid. Knowledge of algebra, trigonometry, differentiation and integration required.

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

      Type:

      NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS,SCI TECH ENGNR

    • PHYS-152 University Physics II

      Prerequisites:

      PHYS 151, PHYS L152 concurrently

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      This calculus based course begins with topics in kinetic theory and the laws of thermodynamics. It then covers electric charge and field, Gauss' law, electrical potential and capacitance, electric currents and DC circuits. Next magnetism, electromagnetic induction, Faraday's law and AC circuits are discussed. This is followed by Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic waves, and properties of light.

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

      Type:

      NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS,SCI TECH ENGNR

    • PHYS-L152 University Physics Lab II

      Prerequisites:

      PHYS 151 and L151 and PHYS 152 must be taken concurrently

      Credits:

      1.00

      Description:

      The laboratory consists of experiments to illustrate the basic concepts studied in the course: heat, gas laws, electric forces, field, and potential, DC and AC circuits, magnetic field, electromagnetic induction, Faraday's law, optics. Calculus, algebra, trigonometry are required. Error propagation, use of Excel, laboratory notebooks, and formal reports required.

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

      Type:

      NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS,SCI TECH ENGNR

    • MATH-165 Calculus I

      Prerequisites:

      Math Placement score or MATH 121 with a grade of C or better

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      Functions, limits and continuity; instantaneous rate of change, tangent slopes, and the definition of the derivative of a function; power, product, and quotient rules, trig derivatives, chain rule, implicit differentiation; higher order derivatives; applications(curve sketching, limits at infinity, optimization, differentials); other transcendental functions (inverse trig functions, exponential and log functions, hyperbolic trig functions); anti-derivatives; indefinite integrals; applications (net change). 4 lecture hours plus 1 recitation session each week. Normally offered each semester.

    • MATH-166 Calculus II

      Prerequisites:

      MATH 165 with grade of C or better

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      Riemann sums and definite integrals; Fundamental Theorem; applications (areas); integration of exponential functions, trig functions, and inverse trig functions; techniques of integration (by parts, trig substitution, partial fractions); area, volume, and average value applications; differential equations (separable, exponential growth, linear); infinite sequences and series; convergence tests; power series; Taylor and Maclaurin series (computation, convergence, error estimates, differentiation and integration of Taylor series). 4 lecture hours plus 1 recitation session each week. Normally offered each semester.

    • MATH-265 Calculus III

      Prerequisites:

      MATH 166 with grade of C or better

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      Parametric equations and polar coordinates (curves, areas, conic sections); vectors and the geometry of space (the dot product, vector arithmetic, lines and planes in 3-space, the cross product, cylinders and quadratic surfaces); vector functions (limits, derivatives and integrals, motion in space); partial derivatives (functions of several variables, limits and continuity, tangent planes and differentials, chain rule, directional derivatives, gradient, extrema, Lagrange multipliers); multiple integrals (double integrals, applications); vector calculus (vector fields, line integrals, fundamental theorem for line integrals, Green's Theorem, curl and divergence, parametric surfaces, surface integrals). 4 lecture hours plus 1 recitation session each week. Normally offered each semester.

    • ECE-225 Linear Systems

      Prerequisites:

      MATH 166 and ECE 205 with a minimum grade of C; ECE L225 Concurrently.

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Classification of systems, differential equations, linear algebra, discrete mathematics, derivation of the system model, state variable description, impulse response, convolution, frequency response of discrete and continuous systems. Fourier Series,Fourier transforms, Fourier methods of discrete signals, Laplace transforms, Z transform, analysis of control systems.

      Term:

      Offered Spring Term

    • ECE-L225 Linear Systems Lab

      Prerequisites:

      MUST BE TAKEN CONCURRENTLY WITH ECE 225

      Credits:

      1.00

      Description:

      The Linear Systems lab is designed to supplement the Linear Systems course. Matlab simulation of linear systems, Hardware Implementation of Analog Filters, measurement of the transfer function.

      Term:

      Offered Spring Term

    Choose one of the following courses and its corresponding laboratory class:

    • CHEM-111 General Chemistry I

      Prerequisites:

      Placement at MATH 104 or better. Students who do not place at MATH 104 must take MATH 104 concurrently. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM-L111.

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Fundamental principles of chemistry are discussed. Topics include introductions to atomic structure, stoichiometry, the periodic table, the nature of chemical bonds, and chemical reactions. This course is recommended for science and engineering majors or those considering careers in the health sciences.

      Term:

      Offered Fall Term

      Type:

      NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS,SCI TECH ENGNR

    • CHEM-L111 General Chemistry I Lab

      Prerequisites:

      Must be taken concurrently with CHEM 111.

      Credits:

      1.00

      Description:

      Introduction to the basic principles of chemistry through discovery laboratory experiments. Students will be introduced to safe laboratory practices and basic techniques such as determining mass and volume, representing data in the form of tables and graphs, and synthesizing and isolating a metal complex. Workshop activities include understanding modern approaches to the scientific method, reading and understanding the scientific literature, and building molecular models. This laboratory is designed around the foundational laboratory skills practiced by science students in a wide variety of majors. 4-hour laboratory.

      Term:

      Offered Fall Term

      Type:

      NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS,SCI TECH ENGNR

    • BIO-111 Introduction to the Cell

      Prerequisites:

      Must take BIO L111 concurrently

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Explanation of key biological structures and reactions of the cell. This is an introductory course required of all biology majors and minors, and some non-biology science majors. This course is not recommended for the non-science student.

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

    • BIO-L111 Introduction to the Cell Laboratory


    Program requirements

    English Language Requirements

    TOEFL paper-based test score : 550 TOEFL iBT® test : 77

    To study at this university, you have to speak English. We advice you to

    take an IELTS test. More About IELTS

    Requirements

    We do not use specific minimums for scores or grades in the decision process, but weigh all factors together to gain a whole view of you and your potential for success as a Suffolk University student:

    • Level and range of high school courses selected
    • Grades achieved (official high school transcript with senior year grades)
    • SAT or ACT scores (our code is 3771)
    • Recommendations (two required; one from a guidance counselor, one from a teacher)
    • The essay
    • Other required forms
    • Admission interview (optional)
    • Transfer students should view the transfer requirements page for more details.

    In high school, you should have completed:

    • Four units of English
    • Three units of mathematics (algebra I and II and geometry)
    • Two units of science (at least one with a lab)
    • Two units of language
    • One unit of American history
    • Four units distributed among other college preparatory electives

    We may also consider other factors in the review process, such as:

    • Class rank
    • Honors courses
    • AP courses

    We are also very interested in personal qualities that will offer us further insights into you as an applicant, including:

    • Admission interview
    • Extracurricular involvement
    • Community service
    • Special interests

    Work Experience

    No work experience is required.

    Related Scholarships*

    • Academic Excellence Scholarship

      "The Academic Excellence Scholarship can provide up to a 50 % reduction in tuition per semester. These scholarships will be renewed if the student maintains superior academic performance during each semester of their 3-year Bachelor programme. The scholarship will be directly applied to the student’s tuition fees."

    • Alumni Study Travel Fund

      Scholarships for students who are already attending the University of Reading.

    • Amsterdam Merit Scholarships

      The University of Amsterdam aims to attract the world’s brightest students to its international classrooms. Outstanding students from outside the European Economic Area can apply for an Amsterdam Merit Scholarship.

    * The scholarships shown on this page are suggestions first and foremost. They could be offered by other organisations than Suffolk University. StudyPortals cannot guarantee that the scholarships apply to this university.

    Accreditation

    Our program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, which ensures that your degree gets respect.

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