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  • Tuition Fee:
  • Local: $ 32.6k / academic year
  • Foreign: $ 32.6k / academic year
  • Languages of instruction:
  • English
  • Deadline:
  • 30 November 2016
  • StudyQA ranking:
  • 8887pts.
  • Duration:
  • 4 years

    Photos of university

    As an Applied Physics student at CI, you'll apply the concepts of physics to practical, high-tech uses. You'll gain exposure and aptitude in a variety of disciplines, from mathematics, computer science and engineering to the life sciences and medicine. You'll be well-prepared to start making meaningful contributions to modern interdisciplinary investigations in fields like biophysics, biomedical engineering, bioinformatics, materials science, and medical imaging.

    You will be prepared for a wide range of career options in high-demand, high-reward high-tech positions, as well as graduate and medical school. Applied Physics graduates offer valuable mathematical, computer literacy, experimental, research and problem-solving skills that are attractive to employers in a wide range of industries and specialties.

    PHYS 100. INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICS I (4)

    Three hours of lecture and one three-hour lab per week. Lab fee required.
    A non-calculus based introduction to the concepts and principles of physics. The areas covered include classical mechanics, wave motion and thermal physics. Practical examples will be used to illustrate the relationship between physics and other disciplines, especially the life sciences, and to develop problem-solving skills. Laboratory sessions will include computer-simulated experiments.
    GenEd: B1

    PHYS 101. INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICS II (4)

    Three hours of lecture and one three-hour lab per week. Lab fee required.
    Prerequisite: PHYS 100
    A non-calculus based introduction to the concepts and principles of physics. The areas covered include electromagnetic theory, light, and atomic and nuclear physics. Practical examples will be used to illustrate the relationship between physics and other disciplines, especially the life sciences, and to develop problem-solving skills. Laboratory sessions will include computer-simulated experiments.
    GenEd: B1

    PHYS  103. HOW THINGS WORK (4)

    Three hours lecture per week 
    Introduces the concepts behind everyday objects and experiences. Concentrates on ideas and on familiar scenarios.  Designed to excite students' interests in science while conveying a substantial understanding of our everyday world.

    PHYS 105. INTRODUCTION TO THE SOLAR SYSTEM (4)

    Three hours of lecture and two hours of activities per week.
    Descriptive introduction to the astronomical properties of the Solar System. Topics include: the historical development of astronomy, the laws that govern the behavior of the Universe, the properties of the stars and galaxies, including their origin and evolution and the Big Bang theory. Activity sessions will include computer-simulated exercises, and two field trips.
    GenEd: B1

    PHYS  106.  APPLIED PHYSICS AND MODERN SOCIETY (3)

    Three hours lecture in the lab per week 
    The course provides an introduction to current topics in applied physics in the fields of solid state physics, semiconductors, superconductors and nano-structures. It shows how scientific knowledge, imagination and ingenuity can combine to offer technological solutions to a variety of topical problems. Industries dealing with, for example, detectors, remote sensing, new materials, medical imaging, biophysics, homeland security, telecommunications, and lasers will be covered.

    PHYS  107. THE STARS AND BEYOND (3)

    Three hours lecture per week 
    A tour through the stars and galaxies will uncover some major mysteries of the Universe.  Topics include: the historical development of astronomy; the laws that govern the behavior of the Universe; the birth, life and death of stars; the collision of galaxies; and evidence for the birth and end of the entire Universe.

    PHSC 170. FOUNDATIONS IN PHYSICAL SCIENCE (4)

    Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week.
    Prerequisite: A passing score on the ELM Examination.
    The areas covered include the physical properties of solids, liquids, and gases; physical and chemical changes in matter; atomic theory and the periodic table; the principles of motion and energy; forces and the motion of particles; sources and transformations of energy including heat, electricity, magnetism, light, and sound; renewable and non-renewable energy sources; and the conservation of energy resources. Lab fee required.
    GenEd: B1

    PHYS 200. GENERAL PHYSICS I (4)

    Three hours of lecture and one three-hour lab per week. Lab fee required.
    Prerequisite: MATH 150
    A calculus-based introduction to the concepts and principles of physics. The areas covered include classical mechanics, wave motion and thermal physics. Practical examples will be used to illustrate the relationship between physics and other disciplines, including the life sciences, and to develop problem-solving skills. Laboratory sessions will focus on computer-simulated experiments.
    GenEd: B1

    PHYS 201. GENERAL PHYSICS II (4)

    Three hours of lecture and one three-hour lab per week. Lab fee required.
    Prerequisite: PHYS 200
    A calculus-based introduction to the concepts and principles of physics. The areas covered include electromagnetic theory, light, and atomic and nuclear physics. Practical examples will be used to illustrate the relationship between physics and other disciplines, including the life sciences, and to develop problem-solving skills. Laboratory sessions will focus on computer-simulated experiments.
    GenEd: B1

    PHYS/ART 208. THE PHYSICS OF ART AND VISUAL PERCEPTION (3)

    Two hours lecture and two hours lab per week.
    Prerequisites: none.
    A course on the physics of light, color, art and visual perception. The course will cover the nature of light and optical phenomena, the perception and psychology of color, the reproduction of color in different media, and the analysis of art from a science perspective. The emphasis is on factors which permit the artist and observer to understand and more fully control the design and interpretation of images of all kinds. Demonstrations, experiments, and video/computer simulations are used to analyze signals received by the eyes or instruments.
    GenEd-ID: B1,C1

    PHYS 301. CLASSICAL MECHANICS (3)

    3 hours lecture per week
    Prerequisites PHYS 201, MATH 350
    A differential equation-based introduction to classical mechanics. The areas covered include the Lagrangian formulation, variational principles, Hamiltonian mechanics, and the theory of canonical transformations. Some applications to the motion of rigid bodies, systems of coupled oscillators, and celestial mechanics will be presented.

    PHYS 304. ELECTROMAGNETISM (4)

    4 hours lecture per week
    Prerequisites PHYS 101 or 201, MATH 151
    A calculus-based introduction to the concepts and principles of electricity and magnetism. Topics include: electrostatics, magnetism, electromagnetic theory, fields, electromagnetic waves, Maxwell's equations, and the Special Theory of Relativity. A strong emphasis will be on analytical problem-solving skills and applications.

    PHYS 305. THERMAL AND STATISTICAL PHYSICS (3)

    3 hours lecture per week
    Prerequisites PHYS 201, MATH 350
    Addesses the behavior of energy and matter in systems having a great many particles. Includes both classical and quantum mechanical views of physical systems and begins with the basic concepts of probability and statistics. Particular emphasis will be placed on simple model systems for which quantitative results can be obtained and compared to experiment, such as ideal gases and quantum mechanical spin systems. The course includes the statistics of the microcanonical, canonical, and grand canonical ensembles; the relation between classical and quantum statistical mechanics; the Planck distribution, bosons, fermions, and doped semiconductors, among others; and an introduction to kinetic theory.

    PHYS 306. MODERN PHYSICS (3)

    1.5 hours lecture twice per week
    Prerequisites PHYS 101 or PHYS 201, MATH 151
    Survey of modern physics. Topics include: Special relativity, the Bohr model, Quantum mechanics; photons, the photoelectric effect, probability density, matter waves, Schrodinger mechanics of simple systems, the Uncertainty Principle, tunneling, spin and angular momentum, atomic and molecular structure. Selected topics from
    nuclear and solid state physics. Applications of the principles will be emphasized.

    PHYS  310. ELECTRONICS (4)

    Three hours lecture and two hours activity per week 
    Prerequisite: PHYS 101 or PHYS 201 
    This course covers the basic analog and digital electronic circuits used in a scientific laboratory.  Students  will be introduced to  the operation of simple electronic devices, the basic underlying theory of their operation, and  the applications of a few analog and digital ICs. The emphasis is on applications rather than theory. Consequently there is a strong hands-on component to the subject to enable students to gain practical experience. Experiments will include the testing of actual and virtual circuits, and data acquisition.

    PHYS/BIOL 315. INTRODUCTION TO BIOPHYSICS (4)

    Three hours of lectures and two hours of practical activity per week.
    Prerequisite : PHYS 200
    Corequisite : BIOL 300
    This course applies physical methods to the study of biological systems, including transport processes and membrane phenomena, bioelectric phenomena, photosynthetic systems and visual systems. Biophysical methods will include the techniques of patch clamping and optical tweezers, and the measurement of action potentials and evoked responses.
    There will be an emphasis on modeling and on problem solving, with appropriate mathematics when necessary. The practical activity session will include computer modeling and simulation, and laboratory demonstrations and exercises.

    PHYS/PAMU 335. THE PHYSICS OF MUSIC (3)

    Two hours of lecture and two hours of lab activity per week.
    Prerequisite: None
    This course is designed to give a useful understanding of music and sound for students interested in music, speech, and language. Other students will find it an interesting and understandable introduction to the methods of science. Extensive use of demonstrations and sound analysis computer programs will be used to accomplish these objectives. The format will include lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on use of the computer programs. The student will be responsible for a term project of his or her own choosing using the computer programs.
    GenEd-ID: B1, C1.

    PHYS/ENGL 338. SCIENCE AND CONSCIENCE (3)

    Prerequisite: upper-division standing.
    This course is a team-taught interdisciplinary course that examines various ethical issues within the sciences, using several case studies. The scientific, historical and social aspects of each case study will be examined from different perspectives. Students will learn scientific concepts which will facilitate an informed understanding of the ethical issues involved. Same as PHYS 338.
    GenEd: B1, C2

    PHYS/CHEM 344. ENERGY AND SOCIETY (3)

    Three hours of lecture per week.
    Survey of the physical, chemical, and engineering principles involved in the production of energy from current and potential sources and the economical, environmental, and political issues surrounding energy production. The course will also examine factors that influence worldwide energy policy. Examples of topics included: energy conservation, efficient usage and transportation of energy, energy resources, fossil fuels, active and passive solar energy, biomass, fuel cells, nuclear (fission and fusion) processes, and hydroelectric, tidal, geothermal, and wind power.
    Same as PHYS 344. GenEd: B1 and Interdisciplinary

    PHYS/COMP/MATH 345. DIGITAL IMAGE PROCESSING (3)

    Three hours of lecture in the lab per week.
    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
    An introduction to the basic concepts and techniques for digital image restoration and enhancement, analysis, coding and compression. The emphasis is on processes which analyze primarily two-dimensional discrete images represented at the pixel level, including filtering, noise reduction and segmentation. Fourier analysis techniques will be explored.
    Programming exercises will be used to implement the various processes, and their performance on synthetic and real images will be studied.
    GenEd: B1, B4 and Interdisciplinary
    Same as COMP 345, MATH 345

    PHYS 401. QUANTUM MECHANICS (3)

    3.5 hours lecture per week
    Prerequisites PHYS 306, MATH 350
    Description An introduction to quantum theory, beginning with the Schroedinger equation and the statistical interpretation of the wave function. One-dimensional applications, including the infinite square-well and the harmonic oscillator; in three dimensions, the theory of angular momentum, central potentials, and the hydrogen atom; time-independent perturbation theory, spin, identical particles, and the Pauli exclusion principle. Applications to bound states, tunneling, and the harmonic oscillators applied to photons and phonons in cavities.

    PHYS 406. SOLID STATE PHYSICS (3)

    3 hours lecture per week
    Prerequisites PHYS 306
    Description Provides an introduction to the physical properties of solids, and their importance in high-tech applications. Focuses on the fundamental, unifying concepts and experimental techniques important in understanding the properties of nuclei and electrons in solids. Considers crystals defects that often control the actual properties of materials. The subjects are chosen to establish the basic principles, to describe phenomena that are responsible for the importance of solids in science and technology, and to include topics of current research.

    PHYS/BIOL 416. RADIOBIOLOGY AND RADIONUCLIDES (3)

    Prerequisites: PHYS 201 ; BIOL 300
    Nature and effects of ionizing radiation on biomolecular structures and living cells. Applied radiobiology and radionuclides. Genetic effects of ionizing radiation and methods of protection. Dosimetry

    PHYS/BIOL/HLTH 434. INTRODUCTION TO BIOMEDICAL IMAGING (4)

    Three hours lecture and two hours lab activity per week
    Prerequisite: BIOL 210 or PHYS 200
    The course will present an overview of biomedical images and imaging systems. The fundamental concepts used in several imaging modalities (such as projection radiography, mammography, DEXA, computed tomography, ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging) will be examined: the emphasis will be on an intuitive and descriptive presentation of the main components of these systems. Image formation and reconstruction will be addressed. The resulting clinical images will be correlated with the underlying structure and function of the organs, and the diagnostic utility and limitations of the images will be considered. Same as HLTH 434 and PHYS 434
    GenEd: B2, E and Interdisciplinary Course Learning Objectives

    PHYS/PAMU  436. PHYSICS OF THE PERFORMING ARTS (3)

    Three hours lecture per week 
    Prerequisites:  PA 202 
    Introduction to the physics of movement, lighting, sound and visual/aural perception.  The course emphasizes factors that permit the performance artists to understand and more fully control their performance, with special attention to the study of audience perception.  Demonstrations, experiments and video/computer simulations are used to analyze signals received by the performer and the audience.

    PHYS/COMP/MATH 445. IMAGE ANALYSIS AND PATTERN RECOGNITION (3)

    Three hours of lecture in the lab per week.
    Prerequisite: PHYS/COMP/MATH 345 or consent of instructor.
    The course addresses the issue of analyzing the pattern content within an image. Pattern recognition consists of image segmentation, feature extraction and classification. The principles and concepts underpinning pattern recognition, and the evolution, utility and limitations of various techniques (including neural networks) will be studied. Programming exercises will be used to implement examples and applications of pattern recognition processes, and their performance on a variety of diverse synthetic and real images will be studied, and an individual project report will be completed.
    GenEd-ID: B1, B4.

    PHYS 448. TEAM-BASED RESEARCH (3)

    3 hours lecture per week
    Prerequisites Upper-division standing.
    Description This is a course where students learn to work together in multidisciplinary teams. Teams are assigned a specific practical problem, and have to apply a variety of physical principles to solve the problem. The solution will incorporate design principles, implementation and technological methodologies, and business/management insight. GenEd: B1, B4, Interdisciplinary.

    PHYS/BIOL 464 MEDICAL INSTRUMENTATION (4)

    Three hours of lecture and two hours of lab activity per week, including two field trips per course.
    Prerequisite : BIOL/PHYS/HLTH 434
    The detection, acquisition, processing and display of diagnostic clinical images. The course will concentrate on the fundamentals of the design of the instruments and the use of appropriate reconstruction algorithms in (computed) radiography, (digital) fluoroscopy, computed tomography,ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging and radionuclide imaging. The mathematics will be kept to a minimum. Activities will include image reconstruction examples, investigation of recent innovations, and two trips to local Radiology departments.

    PHYS 490. TOPICS IN PHYSICS (3)

    Three hoursof seminar per week.
    Prerequisites: Upper division standing and consent of instructor.
    In-depth analysis of topics in applied physics. Topics vary each semester. Repeatable by topic.

    PHYS 492. Internship (3)

    Six hours per week.
    Prerequisites: Upper division standing and consent of instuctor.
    Supervised work and study in industrial or scientific setting involving development of skills related to applied physics. All students are required to present their projects at the Senior Colloquium. Graded CR/NC.

    PHYS 494. Independent Research (3)

    Variable hours per week.
    Prerequisites: Senior standing and consent of research advisor.
    Contracted laboratory and/or library research in selected areas within applied physics conducted under the supervision of a faculty member. All students are required to present their projects at the Senior Colloquium.

    PHYS 497. Directed Studies (3)

    Variable hours per week.
    Prerequisite: Senior standing and program approval of written proposal.
    Supervised project involving reading and library research in the field of applied physics. All students are required to present their projects at the Senior Colloquium.

    PHYS 499. Senior Colloquium (1)

    Prerequisites: Senior standing.
    One hour of seminar. Oral presentations of current advances in the field, reports on students’ projects in PHYS 492, 494 or 497 courses, and invited lectures.

    PHYS 510. ADVANCED IMAGE ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES (3)

    Three hours of lecture in the lab per week.
    Prerequisite: Admission to the Computer Science or Mathematics Graduate Program Image processing course in the fundamentals of 2-D digital signal processing with emphasis in image processing techniques, image filtering design and applications. Programming exercises in Matlab (or Octave) will be used to implement the various
    processes, and their performance on synthetic and real images will be studied. Applications in medicine, robotics, consumer electronics and communications.

    PHYS 546. PATTERN RECOGNITION (3)

    Three hours of lecture in the lab per week.
    Prerequisite:
    New and emerging applications of pattern recognition - such as data mining, web searching, multimedia data retrieval, face recognition, and cursive handwriting recognition - require robust and efficient pattern recognition techniques. Statistical decision making and estimation are regarded as fundamental to the study of pattern recognition. The course addresses the issue of analyzing pattern content by feature extraction and classification. The principles and concepts underpinning pattern recognition, and the
    evolution, utility and limitations of various techniques (including neural networks) will be studied. Programming exercises will be used to implement examples and applications of pattern recognition processes, and their performance on a variety of diverse examples will be studied.


    USA requirements for international students

    Each university in the Unites States of America sets its own admission standards so there isn't the same criteria for all the students and the university can decide which applicants meet those standards. The fee for each application is between $35 to $100. 

    After the selections of the universities you want to attend, the best of all would be to contact each university for an application form and more admission information for the international students. Moreover, for a graduate or postgraduate program it's necessary to verify the admission requirements. Some programs require that you send your application directly to their department. 

    Admissions decisions are based on students's academic record and different test scores, such as TOEFL, the SAT or ACT (for undergraduate programs) and GRE or GMAT (for graduate programs). Admission decision is based on your academic results and motivation.


    University requirements


    Program requirements

    To graduate, students must complete 120 units minimum (40 units must be upper division) including all General Education (GE) and Graduation Requirements.  The following areas must be included:

    Additional lower division A-E GE Requirements not met within the major

    Nine units of Upper Division Interdisciplinary GE (UDIGE), courses numbered 330-349 or 430-449. Six units may be within the major, 3 units must be outside the major (C or better grades)

    Multicultural Requirement (C or better grade)

    Language Requirement (C or better grade)

    American Institutions Requirement

    Free electives as needed to meet minimum units for graduation

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