Dartmouth College logo
  • Tuition Fee:
  • Local: $ 46.8k / annual
  • Foreign: $ 46.8k / annual
  • Languages of instruction:
  • English
  • Deadline:
  • 1 January 2016
  • StudyQA ranking:
  • 1033pts.
  • Duration:
  • 4 years

    Photos of university

    We offer undergraduate courses that enable majors and non-majors to understand and evaluate a broad spectrum of biological information. Students find diverse opportunities to pursue cutting-edge research in faculty laboratories and hands-on experimentation. Majors develop an in-depth understanding within an area of concentration, while non-majors explore research methods and approaches in the life sciences. Our faculty are committed to providing students with a broad exposure to biological processes and systems and a deep understanding of biology at environmental, organismal, cellular, and molecular levels. With their faculty advisors, students extract DNA from plant and animal cells, study genetics of diverse life forms and species, translate their findings to higher organisms, and potentially impact human diseases and find solutions to environmental problems.

    Majors

    • Acquire a foundation in biology in order to understand and evaluate a broad spectrum of biological information; for example, information presented in the media and relevant to public policy decisions.
    • Develop an in-depth understanding within a biological area of concentration, designed in consultation with faculty to meet the student’s educational and career goals. Such depth will allow students to understand and critically evaluate current scientific literature in one or more areas of biology.
    • Understand research methods and approaches currently used in the life sciences through coursework and through an independent research project under the supervision of a Dartmouth faculty member.
    • Develop critical thinking and problem solving skills.
    • Develop written and oral communication skills, allowing for accurate  communication of biology information to scientists and non-scientists. 

    Minors

    • Acquire a foundation in biology in order to understand and evaluate a broad spectrum of biological information; for example, information presented in the media and relevant to public policy decisions.
    • Understand research methods and approaches currently used in the life sciences through coursework and by having the opportunity to perform an independent research project under the supervision of a Dartmouth faculty member.
    • Develop critical thinking and problem solving skills.
    • Develop written and oral communication skills, allowing for accurate  communication of biology information to scientists and non-scientists. 

    The biological sciences are a diverse collection of scientific disciplines that interact and intermingle in tremendously complex and interesting ways. To provide the maximum potential for students to explore this vast area of science, the Department of Biological Sciences offers a flexible major that allows students to select coursework to fit their individual interests and career aspirations. Before declaring an area of concentration, students develop their course plan in consultation with one or more faculty advisors.

    Prerequisites: CHEM 5 (Philosophy of Biology) and CHEM 6 (Dinosaurs) (or equivalent), and one quantitative course from among BIOL 29 (Biostatistics), COSC 1 (Introduction to Programming and Computation), ENGS 20 (Introduction to Scientific Computing), EARS 17 (Analysis of Environmental Data), MATH 4 (Applications of Calculus to Medicine and Biology), MATH 8 (Calculus of Functions of One and Several Variables) or above. MATH 10 (Introductory Statistics) satisfies the quantitative requirement. Students who elect to include BIOL 29 (Biostatistics) in their area of concentration must fulfill this prerequisite with one of the other courses listed above. Although not required for the major, some upper-level Biology courses require CHEM 51-52 (Organic Chemistry). In addition, because many graduate and professional schools require CHEM 51-52 (Organic Chemistry) for admission, we highly recommend that students consider taking these courses. Students must pass all prerequisite courses for the major in order to graduate. 

    Foundation Courses: Students take three courses from among four foundation courses: BIOL 12 (Cell Structure and Function); BIOL 13 (Gene Expression and Inheritance); BIOL 15 (Genetic Variation and Evolution); BIOL 16 (Ecology).  The foundation courses are not sequenced and may be taken in any order. In deciding which three courses to select from this list, students should discuss with their faculty advisors which foundation courses would be most appropriate for their area of concentration. Not all foundation courses need to be completed before the student moves on to courses in their area of concentration. 

    Area of Concentration: To complete the major, students focus in an area of concentration by taking seven additional courses, including two courses numbered 50 or above. Biology courses numbered 10 or below may not be counted towards the major (Biology/Chemistry 8 and 9 are the exceptions). Students taking BIOL 11 (The Science of Life) as their first major course may count it as one of the seven courses. Students are not required to limit themselves to the courses listed under a single area. Students may also develop an area of concentration that is not listed. Any Biology faculty member may serve as your advisor even if they are not listed under a specific area of concentration (provided they feel comfortable advising you in that area). Our hope is that together with your advisor you will design a major that fulfills your unique interests and goals.Students interested in other areas should ask the Department Chair or the departmental Undergraduate Committee to suggest a faculty member who would be appropriate to advise the student in developing their course plan. In recognition of the interdisciplinary nature of the life sciences, up to two suitable advanced courses from other departments may be included in the area of concentration when appropriate to the student’s objectives, or a modified major may be constructed. One term of Independent Research (BIOL 95) or Honors Research (BIOL 97) may also be included among the seven courses.

    To satisfy the culminating experience requirement, students must take a course numbered 50 or above normally during their senior year. Any Biology course numbered 50 or above that is appropriate for the student’s area of concentration will satisfy the culminating experience requirement.  Each student will determine with their faculty advisor which course is suitable as a culminating experience for their area of concentration and interests. These courses include the Biology foreign study program, independent research courses, courses that focus on the primary literature in a discipline, and courses with substantial laboratory components and/or individual projects. The culminating experience course should be taken in a student’s senior year, although a course taken in the junior year may in exceptional circumstances satisfy the culminating experience and requires the approval of the Department Chair or the departmental Undergraduate Committee.

    Students who wish to complement their interest in the life sciences with several courses in one or more disciplines, may consider a modified major.  For a modified major, the area of concentration consists of five Biology courses and four suitable advanced courses from another department or combination of departments.  Students taking BIOL 11 (The Science of Life) as their first major course may count it as one of the five courses. Prerequisite and foundation course requirements remain the same. Courses outside the Biology Department may not be substituted for foundation courses, or the five additional Biology courses.

    The prerequisites for the Biology minor are CHEM 5 and CHEM 6 (General Chemistry) and one quantitative course from among BIOL 29 (Biostatistics), COSC 1 (Introduction to Programming and Computation), ENGS 20 (Introduction to Scientific Computing), EARS 17 (Analysis of Environmental Data), MATH 4 (Applications of Calculus to Medicine and Biology), MATH 8 (Calculus of Functions of One and Several Variables) or above. MATH 10 (Introductory Statistics) satisfies the quantitative requirement.  In addition, students will complete two foundation courses and four additional Biology courses. Students may choose to use BIOL 29 (Biostatistics) as a prerequisite or as one of the four additional Biology courses, but not both. Students who elect to count BIOL 29 as one of the four additional courses must fulfill the quantitative prerequisite with one of the other courses listed above.  Students do not need to develop an area of concentration for the minor but they may do so if they wish. Courses outside the Biology Department may not be substituted for foundation courses, or the four additional Biology courses.


    USA requirements for international students

    Each university in the Unites States of America sets its own admission standards so there isn't the same criteria for all the students and the university can decide which applicants meet those standards. The fee for each application is between $35 to $100. 

    After the selections of the universities you want to attend, the best of all would be to contact each university for an application form and more admission information for the international students. Moreover, for a graduate or postgraduate program it's necessary to verify the admission requirements. Some programs require that you send your application directly to their department. 

    Admissions decisions are based on students's academic record and different test scores, such as TOEFL, the SAT or ACT (for undergraduate programs) and GRE or GMAT (for graduate programs). Admission decision is based on your academic results and motivation.


    University requirements


    Program requirements

    1.       SAT Reasoning or ACT (with Writing);

    2.       2 SAT Subject Test Scores;

    3.       The common application essay;

    4.       Within the Common Application, Dartmouth’s writing supplement requires that applicants write a brief response to one of the following supplemental essay prompts. Candidates choose one topic and respond;

    5.       A counselor recommendation and two teacher recommendations. In addition, a peer recommendation is strongly encouraged;

    6.       Resume;

    7.       Brief abstract of an independent research project.

    Dartmouth Scholarships are need-based and are given without expectation of repayment. Amounts range from $1,000 to over $50,000, depending on our determination of your eligibility. Some Dartmouth students will be selected as recipients of one or more of our over 750 endowed scholarship funds. These awards are not additional money, but indicate that the aid already awarded will come from a specific endowed fund. No separate application is required. Students who receive scholarships from external sources can use these funds to reduce the loan and/or job portions of their financial aid packages. Veteran's benefits are included as a resource in the determination of eligibility for Dartmouth scholarship awards. Dartmouth College currently participates at 100% in the Yellow Ribbon Program which supplements GI Bill benefits. For U.S. citizens or permanent residents, the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is the only form required to apply for Federal Financial Aid. The federal government provides Pell Grants to students who qualify on the basis of financial need as determined by their Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOG) are awarded by the College to the most needy students. They vary in amount but do not exceed $4,000 a year. When you apply for financial aid, your parents' country of residence will determine which documents you need to submit. Parents living outside U.S. and Canada should provide income/benefits statement from employer.

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