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  • Tuition Fee:
  • Local: n/a
  • Foreign: $ 16.3k / Semester
  • Languages of instruction:
  • English
  • Deadline:
  • 15 February 2016

    February 15, 2015

    Photos of university / #suffolk_U

    Description

    Suffolk’s math major is about more than just manipulating numbers and solving problems—though that’s a key component. It’s also one of our most collaborative majors, where you’ll transform mathematical ideas into real-world action, working closely alongside professors and fellow students.

    Expect to collaborate with your professors on independent research projects and gain hands-on experience working in the field. Math majors are primed to pursue careers in economics, finance, statistics, insurance, and teaching. Some students opt to combine the major with computer science, further broadening job prospects in the lucrative fields of software development and technology sectors.

    During your junior and senior years, you’ll enjoy exceptionally small classes and a broad array of electives designed to help pinpoint your areas of interest.

    You can major in either Pure Mathematics or Applied Mathematics. If you major in Applied Mathematics, you’ll choose one of four concentrations:

    • Actuarial Science
    • Mathematics with Economics
    • Mathematics with Finance
    • Mathematics with Economics and Finance

    Our math community thrives outside the classroom, too. Many students supplement their classwork with extracurricular pursuits:

    • Training for the Putnam Competition, a prestigious annual math exam administered by the Mathematical Association of America
    • Participation in the Suffolk Undergraduate Mathematics Society, where you’ll connect with other math students for discussions and guest lectures
    • Enrollment in Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU), a transformative program funded by the National Sciences Foundation allowing students to gain rare, hands-on scientific research experience
    • Peer mentoring at MATHshop, Suffolk’s math tutoring program

    Detailed Course Facts

    Application deadline February 15, 2015 Tuition fee
    • USD 16265 Semester (National)

    Full-time: 12-17 credits per semester $16,265

    Start date 2016 Duration full-time 48 months Languages Take an IELTS test
    • English
    Delivery mode On Campus Educational variant Full-time

    Course Content

    Students must complete a minimum of 126 credits for graduation.

    Mathematics Major Programs

    The Department of Mathematics offers mathematics majors in pure mathematics and applied mathematics with an economics/finance concentration. The applied mathematics major offers a choice of four different concentrations in economics/finance.

    I. Mathematics Major in Pure Mathematics: 13 courses and corresponding laboratory classes, 52 credits

    A student majoring in mathematics must successfully complete 40 credits of coursework in mathematics plus 12 credits of coursework in computer science and physics, distributed as follows:

    Major Course Requirements for Pure Mathematics (10 courses, 40 credits)

    • MATH-165 Calculus I

      Prerequisites:

      Math Placement score or MATH 121 with a grade of C or better

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      Functions, limits and continuity; instantaneous rate of change, tangent slopes, and the definition of the derivative of a function; power, product, and quotient rules, trig derivatives, chain rule, implicit differentiation; higher order derivatives; applications(curve sketching, limits at infinity, optimization, differentials); other transcendental functions (inverse trig functions, exponential and log functions, hyperbolic trig functions); anti-derivatives; indefinite integrals; applications (net change). 4 lecture hours plus 1 recitation session each week. Normally offered each semester.

    • MATH-166 Calculus II

      Prerequisites:

      MATH 165 with grade of C or better

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      Riemann sums and definite integrals; Fundamental Theorem; applications (areas); integration of exponential functions, trig functions, and inverse trig functions; techniques of integration (by parts, trig substitution, partial fractions); area, volume, and average value applications; differential equations (separable, exponential growth, linear); infinite sequences and series; convergence tests; power series; Taylor and Maclaurin series (computation, convergence, error estimates, differentiation and integration of Taylor series). 4 lecture hours plus 1 recitation session each week. Normally offered each semester.

    • MATH-265 Calculus III

      Prerequisites:

      MATH 166 with grade of C or better

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      Parametric equations and polar coordinates (curves, areas, conic sections); vectors and the geometry of space (the dot product, vector arithmetic, lines and planes in 3-space, the cross product, cylinders and quadratic surfaces); vector functions (limits, derivatives and integrals, motion in space); partial derivatives (functions of several variables, limits and continuity, tangent planes and differentials, chain rule, directional derivatives, gradient, extrema, Lagrange multipliers); multiple integrals (double integrals, applications); vector calculus (vector fields, line integrals, fundamental theorem for line integrals, Green's Theorem, curl and divergence, parametric surfaces, surface integrals). 4 lecture hours plus 1 recitation session each week. Normally offered each semester.

    • MATH-331 Introduction to Abstract Math

      Prerequisites:

      MATH-165 and MATH-166 with a grade of C or better

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      this course is intended to provide a firm foundation for and a taste of the study of advanced mathematics. While the course content varies somewhat, it is designed to give students a deeper understanding of the algebraic and analytical structure of the integers, the rational numbers and the real numbers and how they act as a building block to a variety of fields of mathematics. Students are introduced to the process of mathematical discovery and the language of mathematics. Exercises and projects are designed to illustrate the need for proof and to further refine the student's ability to analyze, conjecture and write mathematical proofs. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level mathematics courses and, after completing it a student will be in a position to determine realistically if he or she ought to major or minor in mathematics.

    • MATH-431 Linear Algebra

      Prerequisites:

      Math 331 must have grade C or higher

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      System of linear equations, Gaussian elimination, matrices and their algebra, inverse of a matrix, determinants, cofactor expansion, Cramer's rule, vectors in and their algebra, abstract vector spaces, subspaces, linear independence, basis and dimension, linear transformations, isomorphism of vector spaces, rank and nullity, matrix of a linear transformation, inner product spaces, angle and orthogonality, eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a linear transformation, characteristic equation, Cayley-Hamilton theorem, diagonalization.

    • MATH-432 Abstract Algebra

      Prerequisites:

      MATH 431

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      An introduction to elementary group theory, including properties of groups, subgroups, first isomorphism theorem for groups, normal subgroups, finite group classification; elementary properties of rings, such as homomorphisms of rings, ideals, fields, Euclidean algorithm, rings of polynomials, factorization theory, integral domains, associates, primes and units in domains, and other topics in number theory. Prerequisite: MATH 431 with a grade of C or higher.

    • MATH-462 Real Analysis

      Prerequisites:

      MATH 331 with at least a grade of C

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      A detailed treatment of the basic concepts of analysis including the real numbers; completeness and its equivalence to other properties of the reals such as monotone convergence, Archimedean property, Bolzano-Weierstrass theorem; the topology of Euclidean spaces, compactness and the Heine-Borel theorem, connectedness, continuity and uniform continuity and uniform continuity, pointwise and uniform convergence of functions, and an introduction to metric spaces.

    Choose 2 additional 4-credit mathematics courses at or above the 200 level Choose 1 additional 4-credit mathematics course at or above the 300 level

    Complementary Major Requirements for Pure Mathematics (3 courses and corresponding laboratory classes, 12 credits)

    • CMPSC-F131 Computer Science I

      Prerequisites:

      Must be taken concurrently with CMPSC R131

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      This is a rigorous introduction to computer science in Java with an emphasis on problem solving, structured programming, object-oriented programming, and graphical user interfaces. Topics include expressions, input/output, control structures, intrinsic data types, classes and methods, iteration, top-down programming, arrays, graphical user interfaces, and elements of UML. Normally offered each semester.

      Type:

      Quantitative Reasoning

    • PHYS-151 University Physics I

      Prerequisites:

      Take MATH-121 or MATH 165. PHYS L151 concurrently

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Introduction to the fundamental principles of physics using calculus. The course includes the study of vectors, Newton's laws, rotations, rigid body statics and dynamics, simple harmonic motion, heat and temperature.

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

      Type:

      NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS,SCI TECH ENGNR

    • PHYS-L151 University Physics Lab I

      Prerequisites:

      PHYS 151 concurrently

      Credits:

      1.00

      Description:

      The laboratory consists of experiments to illustrate the basic concepts studied in the course: measurements, propagation of errors, vectors, Newton's laws, work and energy, momentum, rotations, oscillations, simple harmonic motion, fluid. Knowledge of algebra, trigonometry, differentiation and integration required.

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

      Type:

      NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS,SCI TECH ENGNR

    • PHYS-152 University Physics II

      Prerequisites:

      PHYS 151, PHYS L152 concurrently

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      This calculus based course begins with topics in kinetic theory and the laws of thermodynamics. It then covers electric charge and field, Gauss' law, electrical potential and capacitance, electric currents and DC circuits. Next magnetism, electromagnetic induction, Faraday's law and AC circuits are discussed. This is followed by Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic waves, and properties of light.

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

      Type:

      NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS,SCI TECH ENGNR

    • PHYS-L152 University Physics Lab II

      Prerequisites:

      PHYS 151 and L151 and PHYS 152 must be taken concurrently

      Credits:

      1.00

      Description:

      The laboratory consists of experiments to illustrate the basic concepts studied in the course: heat, gas laws, electric forces, field, and potential, DC and AC circuits, magnetic field, electromagnetic induction, Faraday's law, optics. Calculus, algebra, trigonometry are required. Error propagation, use of Excel, laboratory notebooks, and formal reports required.

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

      Type:

      NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS,SCI TECH ENGNR

    II. Mathematics Major in Applied Mathematics With Economics/Finance: 17-21 courses, 71-78 credits

    A student majoring in applied mathematics must successfully complete 32 credits of coursework in mathematics, 12 credits of coursework in computer science and economics, and between 27 to 34 credits of coursework in economics/finance depending on the concentration chosen.

    Major Course Requirements (7 courses, 28 credits)

    • MATH-165 Calculus I

      Prerequisites:

      Math Placement score or MATH 121 with a grade of C or better

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      Functions, limits and continuity; instantaneous rate of change, tangent slopes, and the definition of the derivative of a function; power, product, and quotient rules, trig derivatives, chain rule, implicit differentiation; higher order derivatives; applications(curve sketching, limits at infinity, optimization, differentials); other transcendental functions (inverse trig functions, exponential and log functions, hyperbolic trig functions); anti-derivatives; indefinite integrals; applications (net change). 4 lecture hours plus 1 recitation session each week. Normally offered each semester.

    • MATH-166 Calculus II

      Prerequisites:

      MATH 165 with grade of C or better

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      Riemann sums and definite integrals; Fundamental Theorem; applications (areas); integration of exponential functions, trig functions, and inverse trig functions; techniques of integration (by parts, trig substitution, partial fractions); area, volume, and average value applications; differential equations (separable, exponential growth, linear); infinite sequences and series; convergence tests; power series; Taylor and Maclaurin series (computation, convergence, error estimates, differentiation and integration of Taylor series). 4 lecture hours plus 1 recitation session each week. Normally offered each semester.

    • MATH-265 Calculus III

      Prerequisites:

      MATH 166 with grade of C or better

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      Parametric equations and polar coordinates (curves, areas, conic sections); vectors and the geometry of space (the dot product, vector arithmetic, lines and planes in 3-space, the cross product, cylinders and quadratic surfaces); vector functions (limits, derivatives and integrals, motion in space); partial derivatives (functions of several variables, limits and continuity, tangent planes and differentials, chain rule, directional derivatives, gradient, extrema, Lagrange multipliers); multiple integrals (double integrals, applications); vector calculus (vector fields, line integrals, fundamental theorem for line integrals, Green's Theorem, curl and divergence, parametric surfaces, surface integrals). 4 lecture hours plus 1 recitation session each week. Normally offered each semester.

    • MATH-255 Probability and Statistics

      Prerequisites:

      MATH-165 with a grade of C or better

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      Topics include: random variable and distribution; expectation and variance; special discrete/continuous distributions (uniform, binomial, negative binomial, geometric, hypergeometric, Poisson, normal, and exponential distributions); joint distribution, marginal distribution and conditional distribution; covariance; limit theorems (law of large numbers and central limit theorem); introduction to confidence interval and hypothesis testing; regression analysis. Offered as needed.

    • MATH-331 Introduction to Abstract Math

      Prerequisites:

      MATH-165 and MATH-166 with a grade of C or better

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      this course is intended to provide a firm foundation for and a taste of the study of advanced mathematics. While the course content varies somewhat, it is designed to give students a deeper understanding of the algebraic and analytical structure of the integers, the rational numbers and the real numbers and how they act as a building block to a variety of fields of mathematics. Students are introduced to the process of mathematical discovery and the language of mathematics. Exercises and projects are designed to illustrate the need for proof and to further refine the student's ability to analyze, conjecture and write mathematical proofs. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level mathematics courses and, after completing it a student will be in a position to determine realistically if he or she ought to major or minor in mathematics.

    • MATH-431 Linear Algebra

      Prerequisites:

      Math 331 must have grade C or higher

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      System of linear equations, Gaussian elimination, matrices and their algebra, inverse of a matrix, determinants, cofactor expansion, Cramer's rule, vectors in and their algebra, abstract vector spaces, subspaces, linear independence, basis and dimension, linear transformations, isomorphism of vector spaces, rank and nullity, matrix of a linear transformation, inner product spaces, angle and orthogonality, eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a linear transformation, characteristic equation, Cayley-Hamilton theorem, diagonalization.

    • MATH-462 Real Analysis

      Prerequisites:

      MATH 331 with at least a grade of C

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      A detailed treatment of the basic concepts of analysis including the real numbers; completeness and its equivalence to other properties of the reals such as monotone convergence, Archimedean property, Bolzano-Weierstrass theorem; the topology of Euclidean spaces, compactness and the Heine-Borel theorem, connectedness, continuity and uniform continuity and uniform continuity, pointwise and uniform convergence of functions, and an introduction to metric spaces.

    Choose additional mathematics/statistics courses at the 200-level or higher, depending on the concentration chosen

    Complementary Major Course Requirements (3 courses, 12 credits)

    • EC-101 Applied Microeconomics

      Prerequisites:

      Non CAS majors need to have completed at least 16 credits.

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      This course introduces students to foundational principles of microeconomic theory, with an emphasis on applications of concepts to management decision-making in specific industry and market settings. It describes and analyzes the interaction of supply and demand and the behavior of the prices of goods, services. It explains the determinations of costs, output, strategic pricing, and governance by firms under conditions of perfect and imperfect competition in a global economy. In addition, it describes the supply demand for factors of production and the impact of taxes and government regulation and intervention on firms and consumers.

      Type:

      Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

    • EC-102 Global Macroeconomics

      Prerequisites:

      Non-CAS majors need to have completed at least 16 credits

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      This course examines the workings of the national and the global economy. It will describe the determination of Gross Domestic Product, the problems of unemployment, inflation, and the determination of economic growth. It will also describe and analyze the determination of the country's exchange rate, the balance of payments, and international borrowing and lending. A particular focus will be on understanding economic fluctuations (booms, busts, and recessions) in the domestic economy and its effects on other economies. It will analyze the role of the government and the effects of government spending and taxation on the economy. Furthermore, it will describe and analyze the determination of the quantity of money and interest rates in the economy and the role of the country's central bank. It examines the basis and pattern of international trade and the effects of a country's trade policy on the economy.

      Type:

      Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

    Choose 1 course in computer science

    Economics-Finance Concentration Requirements

    A student must select one of the following concentrations:

    (A) Actuarial Science Concentration

    • ACCT-201 Acct for Decision Making I

      Prerequisites:

      WRI 102 or SBS 220; MATH 128 or higher

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Designed to provide a user of accounting information with the skills to appraise and manage a business. Students are introduced to the accounting cycle, the financial statements, and the theory underlying accounting as information. Coverage addresses current accounting topics, including relevant ethical and international issues found in the financial press.

    • ACCT-202 Acct for Decision Making II

      Prerequisites:

      ACCT-201

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Enables students to apply the concepts and skills from the preceding course. They learn how to analyze the financial condition and performance of a firm, and how to use accounting information in business planning, decision-making, and control. Relevant current ethical and competitive issues found in the financial press are discussed in the course.

    • FIN-310 Business Finance

      Prerequisites:

      MATH 130 or above; EC 101; ACCT 201; STATS 240 or 250 (can take concurrently with FIN 310); sophomore standing

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      This course is a study of the functions of business finance and focuses on basic financial principles such as time value of money, risk and return tradeoffs, and asset valuation.

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

    • MATH-290 Financial Mathematics I

      Prerequisites:

      MATH-166 with a grade of C or better

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      This course is mainly designed for students who are interested in financial mathematics and/or actuarial sciences, especially if they plan to take the second actuarial exam, and/or if they plan to study more in financial mathematics. The materials covered include time value of money, annuities, loans, bonds, cash flows and portfolios, general derivatives, options, hedging and investment strategies, forwards and futures, and swaps.

      Type:

      Expanded Classroom Requirement

    • STATS-350 Applied Statistical Methods

      Prerequisites:

      STATS 250

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      This application-oriented course is designed to go beyond the topics covered in STATS 250. It includes topics like Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), special topics in regression analysis and index numbers. Further, time series data, which consist of values corresponding to different time intervals, are analyzed. The objective is to examine past time series values to forecast, or predict future values. Seasonal variations are also incorporated in the forecasts. The course will provide useful computer skills involving various statistical packages and is an excellent preparation for graduate work in business and social sciences.

      Type:

      Social Science

    • ISOM-120 Information Technology and Productivity

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      This course provides a comprehensive introduction to information technology and information systems concepts. Students learn the importance of modern information technologies in the workplace. The course covers technology resources of the digital age, such as computer software, hardware, communication, database and telecommunication systems. Students also learn to increase productivity through the integration and use of productivity software applications, such spreadsheets, presentation software and databases. In addition, students learn the fundamental concepts of database design and relational database management systems (DBMS) such as Microsoft access.

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Choose one 4-credit elective in mathematics at or above the 200-levelChoose one of the following Finance courses:
    • FIN-311 Intermediate Finance

      Prerequisites:

      FIN 200 (formerly FIN 310)

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Intermediate Finance expands on basic financial concepts and introduces more advanced topics. Material emphasizes solutions to problems of capital structure, investment and financing. Other major topics include distribution policy, working capital management, derivative corporate securities, and corporate restructuring.

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

    • FIN-313 General Insurance

      Prerequisites:

      FIN 200 (formerly FIN 310); Junior standing

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      This course includes the theory, practice and problems of risk bearing in business and personal pursuits including life, property and casualty insurance and dealing with contract analysis and investments as well as corporate risk management.

      Term:

      Offered Fall Term

    • FIN-315 Principles of Investments

      Prerequisites:

      FIN 200 (formerly FIN 310); Junior standing

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      This course covers the investment of funds by individuals and institutions. Focuses on analysis of investments and security markets, and the mechanics of trading and investing. A variety of investment vehicles are discussed, including stocks, bonds, futures, and options.

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

    • FIN-411 Futures & Options

      Prerequisites:

      FIN 315; Junior standing;

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      This course is an in-depth analysis of derivatives: futures, options, and swaps. The course explains why these securities exist, where and how they are traded, how to employ them in managing risk, and how to accurately price them. It also covers the use of these derivatives in the context hedging or speculation.

      Term:

      Offered Spring Term

    • FIN-413 Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management

      Prerequisites:

      FIN 315, Junior standing

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      This course is an advanced course in investment analysis stressing efficient frontier and diversification. Also studies portfolio construction and management, and the tradeoff of risk versus return.

      Term:

      Offered Fall Term

    (B) Math with Economics Concentration
    • STATS-350 Applied Statistical Methods

      Prerequisites:

      STATS 250

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      This application-oriented course is designed to go beyond the topics covered in STATS 250. It includes topics like Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), special topics in regression analysis and index numbers. Further, time series data, which consist of values corresponding to different time intervals, are analyzed. The objective is to examine past time series values to forecast, or predict future values. Seasonal variations are also incorporated in the forecasts. The course will provide useful computer skills involving various statistical packages and is an excellent preparation for graduate work in business and social sciences.

      Type:

      Social Science

    Choose one of the following Economics courses:
    • EC-311 Intermediate Micro Theory

      Prerequisites:

      EC 101 and EC 102

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      Theory of consumer behavior and demand. Theory of production and costs of production. Theory of the firm, and price and output decisions in different market structures, i.e., under perfect competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition and oligopoly. Decisions relating to pricing and employment of various inputs (labor and capital) under perfectly competitive, and less than perfectly competitive, resource markets. Required of all majors in Economics. Normally offered every semester.

      Type:

      Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

    • EC-312 Intermediate Macro Theory

      Prerequisites:

      EC-101 and EC-102

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      This course covers the neoclassical and Keynesian models of aggregate economic activity. Coverage of the measurement of economic variables, such as aggregate income, the inflation rate, and the unemployment rate. Examines the behavior of the economy under conditions of price flexibility in the long run and price rigidity in the short run under rational and adaptive expectations. Analysis of the effect of changes in taxes and government expenditures, monetary policy and deficits on the economy. Coverage of the sources of economic growth. Required of all majors in Economics. Normally offered every semester.

      Type:

      Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

    Choose 3 courses in economics (one of which must be at the 400-level)Choose two 4-credit electives in mathematics at or above the 200-level (C) Math with Finance Concentration
    • ACCT-201 Acct for Decision Making I

      Prerequisites:

      WRI 102 or SBS 220; MATH 128 or higher

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Designed to provide a user of accounting information with the skills to appraise and manage a business. Students are introduced to the accounting cycle, the financial statements, and the theory underlying accounting as information. Coverage addresses current accounting topics, including relevant ethical and international issues found in the financial press.

    • ACCT-202 Acct for Decision Making II

      Prerequisites:

      ACCT-201

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Enables students to apply the concepts and skills from the preceding course. They learn how to analyze the financial condition and performance of a firm, and how to use accounting information in business planning, decision-making, and control. Relevant current ethical and competitive issues found in the financial press are discussed in the course.

    • FIN-310 Business Finance

      Prerequisites:

      MATH 130 or above; EC 101; ACCT 201; STATS 240 or 250 (can take concurrently with FIN 310); sophomore standing

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      This course is a study of the functions of business finance and focuses on basic financial principles such as time value of money, risk and return tradeoffs, and asset valuation.

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

    • ISOM-120 Information Technology and Productivity

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      This course provides a comprehensive introduction to information technology and information systems concepts. Students learn the importance of modern information technologies in the workplace. The course covers technology resources of the digital age, such as computer software, hardware, communication, database and telecommunication systems. Students also learn to increase productivity through the integration and use of productivity software applications, such spreadsheets, presentation software and databases. In addition, students learn the fundamental concepts of database design and relational database management systems (DBMS) such as Microsoft access.

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Choose 4 courses in finance (at 300-level or above)Choose two 4-credit electives in mathematics at or above the 200-level or choose STATS -350 and one 4-credit MATH elective at or above the 200-level

    (D) Math with Economics and Finance Concentration

    • ACCT-201 Acct for Decision Making I

      Prerequisites:

      WRI 102 or SBS 220; MATH 128 or higher

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Designed to provide a user of accounting information with the skills to appraise and manage a business. Students are introduced to the accounting cycle, the financial statements, and the theory underlying accounting as information. Coverage addresses current accounting topics, including relevant ethical and international issues found in the financial press.

    • ACCT-202 Acct for Decision Making II

      Prerequisites:

      ACCT-201

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Enables students to apply the concepts and skills from the preceding course. They learn how to analyze the financial condition and performance of a firm, and how to use accounting information in business planning, decision-making, and control. Relevant current ethical and competitive issues found in the financial press are discussed in the course.

    • FIN-310 Business Finance

      Prerequisites:

      MATH 130 or above; EC 101; ACCT 201; STATS 240 or 250 (can take concurrently with FIN 310); sophomore standing

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      This course is a study of the functions of business finance and focuses on basic financial principles such as time value of money, risk and return tradeoffs, and asset valuation.

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

    • ISOM-120 Information Technology and Productivity

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      This course provides a comprehensive introduction to information technology and information systems concepts. Students learn the importance of modern information technologies in the workplace. The course covers technology resources of the digital age, such as computer software, hardware, communication, database and telecommunication systems. Students also learn to increase productivity through the integration and use of productivity software applications, such spreadsheets, presentation software and databases. In addition, students learn the fundamental concepts of database design and relational database management systems (DBMS) such as Microsoft access.

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

    • EC-311 Intermediate Micro Theory

      Prerequisites:

      EC 101 and EC 102

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      Theory of consumer behavior and demand. Theory of production and costs of production. Theory of the firm, and price and output decisions in different market structures, i.e., under perfect competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition and oligopoly. Decisions relating to pricing and employment of various inputs (labor and capital) under perfectly competitive, and less than perfectly competitive, resource markets. Required of all majors in Economics. Normally offered every semester.

      Type:

      Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

    • EC-312 Intermediate Macro Theory

      Prerequisites:

      EC-101 and EC-102

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      This course covers the neoclassical and Keynesian models of aggregate economic activity. Coverage of the measurement of economic variables, such as aggregate income, the inflation rate, and the unemployment rate. Examines the behavior of the economy under conditions of price flexibility in the long run and price rigidity in the short run under rational and adaptive expectations. Analysis of the effect of changes in taxes and government expenditures, monetary policy and deficits on the economy. Coverage of the sources of economic growth. Required of all majors in Economics. Normally offered every semester.

      Type:

      Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

    Choose 2 courses in economics (one of which must be at the 400-level)Choose 2 courses in financeChoose one 4-credit elective in mathematics at or above the 200-level or
    • STATS-350 Applied Statistical Methods

      Prerequisites:

      STATS 250

      Credits:

      4.00

      Description:

      This application-oriented course is designed to go beyond the topics covered in STATS 250. It includes topics like Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), special topics in regression analysis and index numbers. Further, time series data, which consist of values corresponding to different time intervals, are analyzed. The objective is to examine past time series values to forecast, or predict future values. Seasonal variations are also incorporated in the forecasts. The course will provide useful computer skills involving various statistical packages and is an excellent preparation for graduate work in business and social sciences.

      Type:

      Social Science

    For a Suggested Course Sequence, visit the department's website.


    USA requirements for international students

    Each university in the Unites States of America sets its own admission standards so there isn't the same criteria for all the students and the university can decide which applicants meet those standards. The fee for each application is between $35 to $100. 

    After the selections of the universities you want to attend, the best of all would be to contact each university for an application form and more admission information for the international students. Moreover, for a graduate or postgraduate program it's necessary to verify the admission requirements. Some programs require that you send your application directly to their department. 

    Admissions decisions are based on students's academic record and different test scores, such as TOEFL, the SAT or ACT (for undergraduate programs) and GRE or GMAT (for graduate programs). Admission decision is based on your academic results and motivation.


    University requirements


    Program requirements

    English Language Requirements

    TOEFL paper-based test score : 550 TOEFL iBT® test : 77

    To study at this university, you have to speak English. We advice you to

    take an IELTS test. More About IELTS

    Requirements

    We do not use specific minimums for scores or grades in the decision process, but weigh all factors together to gain a whole view of you and your potential for success as a Suffolk University student:

    • Level and range of high school courses selected
    • Grades achieved (official high school transcript with senior year grades)
    • SAT or ACT scores (our code is 3771)
    • Recommendations (two required; one from a guidance counselor, one from a teacher)
    • The essay
    • Other required forms
    • Admission interview (optional)
    • Transfer students should view the transfer requirements page for more details.

    In high school, you should have completed:

    • Four units of English
    • Three units of mathematics (algebra I and II and geometry)
    • Two units of science (at least one with a lab)
    • Two units of language
    • One unit of American history
    • Four units distributed among other college preparatory electives

    We may also consider other factors in the review process, such as:

    • Class rank
    • Honors courses
    • AP courses

    We are also very interested in personal qualities that will offer us further insights into you as an applicant, including:

    • Admission interview
    • Extracurricular involvement
    • Community service
    • Special interests

    Work Experience

    No work experience is required.

    Related Scholarships*

    • Academic Excellence Scholarship

      "The Academic Excellence Scholarship can provide up to a 50 % reduction in tuition per semester. These scholarships will be renewed if the student maintains superior academic performance during each semester of their 3-year Bachelor programme. The scholarship will be directly applied to the student’s tuition fees."

    • Alumni Study Travel Fund

      Scholarships for students who are already attending the University of Reading.

    • Amsterdam Merit Scholarships

      The University of Amsterdam aims to attract the world’s brightest students to its international classrooms. Outstanding students from outside the European Economic Area can apply for an Amsterdam Merit Scholarship.

    * The scholarships shown on this page are suggestions first and foremost. They could be offered by other organisations than Suffolk University.

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