Asian and Middle Eastern Studies Program

Study mode:On campus Study type:Full-time Languages: English
Local:$ 46.8 k / Year(s) Foreign:$ 46.8 k / Year(s) Deadline: Jan 1, 2025
101 place StudyQA ranking:4812 Duration:4 years

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The Asian and Middle Eastern Studies Program (AMES) at Dartmouth is an interdisciplinary degree program. In consultation with a faculty advisor, each student designs a course of study that emphasizes one or more disciplines and a region of Eurasia. At present the AMES curriculum and faculty are grouped around the following specializations: East Asia, Middle East (and North Africa),South/Southeast Asia and Central Asia. Students may also elect to specialize in Interregional Studies, working with AMES faculty with relevant interests.

Although language study is not required for the AMES degree, the faculty encourages it strongly. In most cases students will study languages offered in the Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Languages and Literatures (DAMELL--Arabic, Chinese, Hebrew, and Japanese). Students specializing in Central Asia are also encouraged to study Russian, and students specializing in parts of the Middle East, particularly North Africa, are encouraged to study French.

Many AMES majors participate in AMES-related off-campus programs during their studies. DAMELL manages Foreign Study Programs in Beijing and in Tangier, Morocco, and an LSA+ program near Tokyo. The AMES Program manages Foreign Study Programs in Fez, Morocco, and, in partnership with Women's and Gender Studies, in Hyderabad, India, and a Foreign Exchange Program in Seoul, Korea. Students wishing to study other languages should consult with their advisors.

The AMES major requires a minimum of ten courses. At least one of the ten courses must fulfill AMES' Interregional Requirement (Asian Animation as Socio-Political Artifact; Magic and Supernaturalism in Asian Literature and Film; Nomads from Central Asia to the Middle East: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives). At least one of the ten courses must qualify as an AMES Culminating Experience (Senior Seminar: Research Topics in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies; Colonial Photography in Asia and the Middle East; Dilemmas of Development: India, China, and the Middle East; Asia, the Middle East, and the Cold War). These seminar-style courses are designed to accommodate student interest in any of AMES' area concentrations. Departmental senior seminars taught by an AMES-affiliated faculty member. Students must submit a written rationale for such a substitution to the AMES chair no later than the fifth week of the term prior to taking the seminar. Advanced Independent Research is also an acceptable substitute. Students must submit a research proposal for approval by the AMES Steering Committee no later than the fifth week of the term. Students writing an AMES honors thesis are exempted from the culminating experience requirement. The remaining eight courses should focus on one of the three area concentrations offered by AMES: East Asia, South and Southeast Asia, or the Middle East (which includes North Africa). Students who wish to combine courses from more than one area-concentration must submit a written rationale for their course selection to the AMES Steering Committee no later than the fifth week of the fall term of their senior year. A contingency plan is advisable in the event that the Steering Committee does not approve your course selection. With careful planning, students can construct a Central Asian concentration. It is also possible to construct an Interregional major. These options require a written proposal developed in consultation with the AMES chair. The proposal must be submitted to the AMES Steering Committee no later than the fifth week of the fall term in a student's senior year. Students are strongly encouraged to study at least two years of a language offered by the Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Languages and Literatures (AMELL). Up to four language courses can count toward an AMES major. These courses must relate to the student's area concentration and be above the first-year level. AMES majors are encouraged to pursue study abroad in a program related to their area concentration. AMES offers three such programs: an FSP in Fez, Morocco; an FSP in Hyderabad, India; and an exchange program with Yonsei University in Seoul, Korea. The Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Languages and Literatures (AMELL) also offers FSP and/or LSA programs in Morocco, China, and Japan. Courses taken on these programs receive AMES credit. Students can petition the AMES Steering Committee to grant transfer credit for courses taken in foreign study programs offered by other American undergraduate institutions or in accredited foreign universities. Dartmouth does not grant transfer credits retroactively. The AMES Chair and the Registrar must approve transfer courses prior to enrolling in such courses. Transfer credit forms and deadlines for preapproval of transfer courses are available through the Registrar.

The AMES minor consists of six courses drawn from one area concentration. The minor should include five non-language courses, one of which should be an Interregional Course (Asian Animation as Socio-Political Artifact; Magic and Supernaturalism in Asian Literature and Film; Nomads from Central Asia to the Middle East: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives) and a Culminating Experience (Senior Seminar: Research Topics in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies; Colonial Photography in Asia and the Middle East; Dilemmas of Development: India, China, and the Middle East; Asia, the Middle East, and the Cold War).

  1. SAT Reasoning or ACT (with Writing);
  2. 2 SAT Subject Test Scores;
  3. The common application essay;
  4. Within the Common Application, Dartmouth’s writing supplement requires that applicants write a brief response to one of the following supplemental essay prompts. Candidates choose one topic and respond;
  5. A counselor recommendation and two teacher recommendations. In addition, a peer recommendation is strongly encouraged;
  6. Resume;
  7. Brief abstract of an independent research project;
  8. IELTS or TOEFL (no minimum scores);
  9. Determine the area concentration that best represents your interests;
  10. Fill out your area-concentration worksheet and three major cards (available from the Registrar's Office);
  11. Arrange an appointment with the AMES Chair to have your worksheet approved and your major cards signed.

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