Latin American and Caribbean Studies

Study mode:On campus Study type:Full-time Languages: English
Foreign:$ 16.3 k / Semester(s) Deadline: Feb 15, 2025
StudyQA ranking:3651 Duration:48 months

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Description

The Latin American and Caribbean studies program seeks to develop a deeper understanding of the peoples and cultures of our Latin American and Caribbean neighbors. Through a multidisciplinary program in the humanities and social sciences, students prepare to pursue their interests in international organizations, education, business, government, communication and journalism.

Demonstrated proficiency in Spanish beyond the Intermediate level is required. Normally this can be fulfilled by successful completion of one 300-level course. For native speakers and in the case where the student’s area of interest is better served by knowledge of another language (e.g., Portuguese or French), proficiency will be determined by an examination administered by the Department of World Languages and Cultural Studies.

Learning Objectives

Foreign language requirement: Students must demonstrate proficiency beyond the intermediate level in French, Portuguese or Spanish. They must achieve a competent command of either French, Spanish or Portuguese with limited errors in vocabulary and syntax.

Cultural awareness: Students should demonstrate a broad yet integrated knowledge of the cultural, economic, geographical, historical, political and social reality of Latin America and the Caribbean. They should also demonstrate an appreciation of the presence and impact of Latino and Caribbean cultures in the United States and abroad.

Critical and analytical thinking: Students should demonstrate a multidisciplinary understanding of the region through an effective research methodology which cogently integrates different points of view that reflect the complexity of Latin America and the Caribbean. This includes the ability to comprehend and synthesize different types of cultural phenomena; to develop a working thesis and defend it through proper use of evidence and argument; and to write a coherent, critical essay that properly documents both primary and secondary sources.

Detailed Course Facts

Application deadline February 15, 2015 Tuition fee
  • USD 16265 Semester (National)

Full-time: 12-17 credits per semester $16,265

Start date 2016 Duration full-time 48 months Languages Take an IELTS test
  • English
Delivery mode On Campus Educational variant Full-time

Course Content

Major Requirements: 10 courses, 40 credits

The major in Latin American and Caribbean Studies requires 10 courses (40 credits) of interdisciplinary work consisting of 5 core courses (20 credits) and 5 related courses (20 credits).

Required Core Component (5 courses, 20 credits)

  • GVT-281 Intro to Comparative Politics

    Prerequisites:

    GVT 110 and GVT 120 or consent of instructor.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course examines various methods of comparing political systems. Institutions such as executive departments, legislatures, court systems and local governmental systems are examined comparatively. It includes analysis of the impact of different economic systems on political/governmental institutions, and on economic circumstances that impact government. It also looks at political socialization both in terms of process and comparative content. An effort is made to include countries from all regions of the world. Normally offered every year.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • HST-276 History of Modern Latin America

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The development of Latin American states: society, economy and culture, from colonial origins to the present. Cultural Diversity B

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

Choose one of the following Sociology courses:

  • SOC-227 Race in American Society

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Despite the election of Barack Obama as President of the United States, race remains one of the most divisive forces in U.S. society. While many of us struggle against racism, racial classification continues to affect where we live, where we work, and how we see ourselves. Racial classification affects our access to health care and our encounters with police officers. Distorted images of racial groups fill television and movie screens. Appeals to racism and fear of foreigners are dominant themes in elections to state and national offices. This course examines the formation and re-formation of racial classifications: how particular groups become racially identified, how these classifications change over time, and how conflicts over race have shaped American society. The meanings of race, as seen from a variety of perspectives, will be a consistent theme throughout the course.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt A,Diverse Perspectives

  • SOC-228 Social, Cultural and Global Perspectives

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Enables students to examine, as well as develop an awareness and appreciation of, diversity within today's society. Providing an overview of the major racial, ethnic, and cultural groups in the U.S., the focus is on the ways in which cultural awareness enhances professional helping relationships and improves the operation of human services systems.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt A,Diverse Perspectives

Choose one of the following Economics courses:

  • EC-141 Development Economics

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Why do so many countries remain so poor? Why have some (e.g. the Asian tigers) grown so rapidly? Why have most of the countries of Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union been slow to ignite economic growth? These questions are addressed by looking at domestic factors (government policies, resource endowments) as well as the international environment (mobile investors, international financial institutions). Asks what economic choices these countries face now. Normally offered yearly. Cultural Diversity B

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Social Science,Asian Studies,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • EC-151 Economic & Human Geography

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The study of how economic and human activity is distributed across space, the reasons for these spatial distributions, and the processes that change the spatial organization of economic activity over time. Topics include: maps, map projections, and geographic information systems; population geography; the organization and location of cities, towns and villages; transportation and communication policy; industrial location; the geography of world trade; and geographic features of economic development. The course takes a global perspective, and draws on cases and examples from all over the world. Cultural Diversity B

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE,Asian Studies

Choose one of the following Spanish courses:

  • SPAN-302 Indigenous and Colonial Latin America

    Prerequisites:

    Spanish 202, 203 or 250 or Instructor's consent. Span 290 or 300 strongly recommended.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A survey of indigenous and colonial Latin America highlighting Pre-Columbian history and culture: in particular the Mayan, Incan, and Aztec civilizations and the Spanish conquest. This course seeks to give students a general understanding of the foundational elements of Latin American society to enable them to better understand modern Latin American culture. Prerequisites: Spanish 202, 203 or Instructor's consent. Span 290 or 300 strongly recommended. Normally offered alternate years. 4 credits. Cultural Diversity B

    Term:

    Alternates Fall & Spring

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement,BA FOREIGN,Diverse P

  • SPAN-303 Modern and Contemporary Latin America

    Prerequisites:

    SPAN 202 or 203 or Instructor's consent. SPAN 290 or 300 strongly recommended.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A historical and cultural survey of Latin America and the Caribbean from the era of independence (1800) to the present day. Among the themes examined will be post-colonialism and nation-building, economic development and modernization, race and ethnicity, authoritarianism and democratization, inter-American relations, and the contributions of Spanish-speaking minorities within the United States. Prerequisites: Spanish 202, 203 or Instructor's consent. Span 290 or 300 strongly recommended.

Elective Courses (5 courses, 20 credits)

At least 2 of the 5 related courses must constitute a concentration in a single discipline or an interdisciplinary field. Course selections will be made in consultation with the Latin American and Caribbean Studies advisor.

Communication and Journalism

  • CJN-255 Introduction to Media

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An introduction to the role of media in contemporary society, focusing on media's influence on cultural, political, and ideological processes. An examination of the historical contexts within which newspapers, radio, television and new media technologies developed and how audiences interact with and influence the use of media.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Social Science

  • CJN-385 Globalization of Media and Telecommunications

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the development of global media and telecommunication corporations and technologies and the influence these transnational organizations and technologies bear on regional and nation-state communication policy, global and local culture, and the world economy. Cultural Diversity B ECR

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE,Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • CJN-491 Special Topics in Communications

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Current issues in the field of communication. Normally offered every semester.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

Economics

  • EC-430 International Trade Theory & Policy

    Prerequisites:

    EC 101 and EC 102

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course examines theories of international trade. The policy implications of each theory are explored and the effect of trade on the welfare of the nation is examined. Also the development of trade blocs and the the political economy of trade are studied. Normally offered every year.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • EC-442 International Monetary Economics

    Prerequisites:

    EC 101 and EC 102

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The balance of payments and foreign exchange markets and instruments, and the determination of exchange rates. Balance-of-payments adjustments under alternative exchange-rate systems, international liquidity, international economics policy and open economy macroeconomics.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

Government

  • GVT-387 Conflict and Reconciliation in Central America

    Prerequisites:

    GVT 281 or instructor's consent. Junior status or above

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    current political trends in the Caribbean and in selected Central American nations. Emphasis will be placed on comparative analysis of public policies in the region, as well as on external factors which impact on politics in the Caribbean and Central America. Students will use academic sources in their analysis, as well as novels and other literary sources for the background of their analysis. Not open to freshmen. Normally offered every third year. Cultural Diversity B

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Social Science,Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • GVT-393 Latin American Politics Today

    Prerequisites:

    GVT 281 or instructor consent

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course examines the evolution of Latin America in the context of globalization. The first part analyzes the main political and economic trends of Latin America as a region, while the second presents the main challenges Mexico is facing today in the area of security. The third part moves forward into the detailed explanation of the transformations of the largest South American countries such as Colombia, Argentina, Chile and Venezuela, among others. The final section looks at the relationship between Latin America and the United States.

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Social Science

  • GVT-466 Regionalism and Sovereignty in the Global Economy

    Prerequisites:

    GVT 261

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course examines the intertwined nature of the globalization and regionalization processes from the perspective of global political economy. The first part of the course provides the basic elements and indicators to understand the main challenges the international economy is facing such as crisis, protectionism, and underdevelopment, inter alia. The second part presents the evolution of globalization and regionalism in the past decades. The third and final section compares how the distinct regions in the world are dealing with local and global problems; particularly attention is paid to the European Union, NAFTA, Mercosur and APEC.

    Type:

    Social Science

  • GVT-469 International Human Rights

    Prerequisites:

    GVT 261 Junior status or above

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An examination of human rights at the end of the 20th century. Attention will be given to the origin and expansion of the concept of human rights in different political systems, the links between culture and human rights and the means and mechanisms for safeguarding human rights with particular reference to the United Nations system.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-507 GVT Study Trip

    Prerequisites:

    INSTRUCTOR'S PERMISSION This course fulfills the Expanded Classroom Requirement

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    APPROVAL OF DEPT. CHAIRPERSON. Specially arranged study trip to a foreign country for the purpose of obtaining knowledge through direct experience and observation. Includes prearranged site visits, meetings, required reading and written assignments. ECR

    Type:

    Social Science,Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • GVT-524 Washington Internship

    Prerequisites:

    This course fulfills the Expanded Classroom Requirement

    Credits:

    8.00

    Description:

    A full-time summer internship in Washington D.C. Consult the Department for more details. ECR

    Type:

    Social Science,Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • GVT-525 Washington Internship Seminar

    Prerequisites:

    Concurrent enrollment in GVT 523 or GVT 524; Sophomore standing;

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    ECR

    Type:

    Social Science,Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • GVT-526 International Internship-London

    Prerequisites:

    Juniors standing; GVT 528 & GVT 529 Concurrent

    Credits:

    8.00

    Description:

    A full-time, one-semester International Internship in London.

    Type:

    Social Science,Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • GVT-528 International Seminar I

    Prerequisites:

    Concurrently with GVT 526 or GVT 530 and GVT 529

    Credits:

    4.00- 8.00

    Description:

    One of two required seminars to be taken by International interns and service learning participation. ECR

    Type:

    Social Science,Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • GVT-529 International Seminar II

    Prerequisites:

    Concurrently with GVT 526 or GVT 530 and GVT 528

    Credits:

    4.00- 8.00

    Description:

    One of two required seminars to be taken by International interns and service learning participation ECR

    Type:

    Social Science,Expanded Classroom Requirement

History

  • HST-276 History of Modern Latin America

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The development of Latin American states: society, economy and culture, from colonial origins to the present. Cultural Diversity B

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-285 Colonial History of Latin America

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An introduction to Latin America's colonial history through the Revolutionary Wars for Independence. The course examines topics that are relevant to issues and challenges facing Latin American and Caribbean peoples today, including poverty, corruption, human rights, the power of religion, race and identity, the environment, international trade, political representation, foreign intervention, cultural survival, and the exploitation of land, labor and resources.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-377 Caribbean and Latin-American Diaspora

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A look at the migration of people, along with their culture, to and from the Caribbean and Latin America. The first half of the course looks at how European, Asian and African diasporas settled in the region, assimilated and contributed to the ethnic and cultural base of Caribbean and Latin America countries in the colonial period. The second half offers insight into how and why people from the Caribbean and Latin America would later form diasporas of their own in countries like the United States in the twentieth century. Students taking this course will get a sense of the struggles, accomplishments and culture of Caribbean and Latin American peoples in the United States. Formerly HST 286.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-396 The African Diaspora

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An examination of the dispersion of Africans to the Americas during the era of the slave trade and the establishment of New World communities of Africans and people of mixed descent. Topics include: the Slave Trade, comparative Slave Systems, Religion, Resistance and Revolutionary Movements, Return and Redemption Movements, Pan Africanism, Race and Class. Cultural Diversity A Cultural Diversity B

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Humanities & History,Cultural Diversity Opt A

  • HST-441 Social Movements in the Caribbean

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A case-study approach to studying the various means by which people in the Caribbean sought to overcome the legacies of colonial exploitation of their land, labor and resources. The course also offers lessons from the case-studies for approaching/achieving positive social change. Students will learn about the people's struggles to improve their social lives, reduce poverty, access land, expand human rights, reduce illiteracy, and gain accountability from their governments through violent and non-violent means.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE

Latin American and Caribbean Studies

  • FR-205 The Francophone World

    Prerequisites:

    FR 202 or Instructor's consent

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course explores the francophone world through the media of literature and film. Selected works of francophone literature will be linked to writing exercises and conversation activities.

    Term:

    Alternates Fall & Spring

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,BA FOREIGN

  • SPAN-390 Introduction to Latin American and Caribbean Literature

    Prerequisites:

    SPAN 300; SPAN 302 is strongly recommended

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Authors from Latin America and the Caribbean will be examined in their historical and cultural contexts. Readings and class discussions will consider the relationship between the writer and society by covering such topics as colonialism, the oral tradition, modernism and the emergence of new narratives in the twentieth century. The Inca Garcilaso, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, Jose Marti, Jorge Luis Borges, and Giaconda Belli will be among some of the writers studied.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Humanities Literature Requirement,BA FOREIGN

  • SPAN-402 Social Literature of Latin America

    Prerequisites:

    SPAN 300 or Instructor's consent. SPAN 302 is strongly recommended.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The relationship between social history, cultural identity and artistic expression will be explored through a diversity of texts from Central and South America, Mexico and the Caribbean. Social justice, truth, mass culture and gender will be among the issues addressed. Readings will include novel, short story, poetry and drama. Films and documentaries will also be considered to further illustrate the connections between society and text.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Humanities Literature Requirement,BA FOREIGN

  • SPAN-405 Women's Voices in Latin America

    Prerequisites:

    SPAN-300; Spanish 302 or its equivalent is strongly recommended

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Through fiction, non-fiction, drama, poetry and film, this course will explore the changing roles of women in Mexico, the Caribbean, Central and South America. Special focus will be placed on the impact that changes in social ideology and culture have had on their identity and writings. Texts available in English.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement,BA FOREIGN

  • SPAN-407 Latin American Short Narrative

    Prerequisites:

    Spanish 300; or Instructor's consent; Spanish 302 is strongly recommended

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An exploration of some of the major trends in twentieth century Latin American story telling. Readings reflect the vast array of voices and styles, beginning with the fantastic literature of the 1930's, the birth of magical realism and the more contemporary socio-political narratives. Authors will include Maria Luisa Bombal, Julio Cortazar, Rosario Castellanos, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Juan Rulfo, Luisa Valenzuela, among others.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement,BA FOREIGN

  • SPAN-408 Latin American Cinema

    Prerequisites:

    Take ENG-102 or ENG-103 or Instructor's consent. Span 302 is strongly recommended for Spanish and Latin American & Caribbean Studies majors and minors.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A survey of films from Argentina, Mexico, Cuba, and other Latin American countries. Occasionally the course includes films produced in the United States that are directed by Hispanic filmmakers or that illustrate the significance of Hispanic culture in North America. Films in Spanish with English subtitles. Discussions in English. All majors and minors are expected to complete their written assignments in Spanish. Cultural Diversity B. Prerequisite: None. SPAN 290 or 300 are strongly recommended. Normally offered alternate years. 4 credits.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • SPAN-416 Border Crossings the Latino Experience in the USA

    Prerequisites:

    ENG-102 or ENG-103 or Instructor's consent. Span 302 is strongly recommended for Spanish and Latin American & Caribbean Studies majors and minors.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt A,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • SPAN-418 Through the Eyes of the Storyteller / Latin American Fiction and Film

    Prerequisites:

    ENG 102 or ENG 103 or Instructor's consent. SPAN 300 and SPAN 302 are strongly recommended for Spanish and Latin American and Caribbean Studies majors and minors.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course examines the intersection between literature and film and the relationships between the written word and the cinematic image. The writers and cinematographers we will study represent mainstream as well as marginal voices which address issues of race, gender, sexual orientation and socio-economic class in South America, the Caribbean and Mexico. All texts available in both Spanish and English translation.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities Literature Requirement,Cultural Diversity Opt B,BA FOREIGN

  • SPAN-425 Literature and Art in Latin America

    Prerequisites:

    Span 290 or Span 300; Instructor's consent; Spanish 302 is strongly recommended

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course will focus on the dynamic relationships that exist between art (both visual and lyrical) and the written word. By reading twentieth century authors from Latin America and the Caribbean and juxtaposing their work with that of other artists who explore similar themes, students will examine the multiple ways in which art and literature contribute to our understanding of life in Latin America and the Caribbean. Music, paintings, photography, poetry, and prose will be among some of the genres studied.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    BA FOREIGN

Sociology

  • SOC-227 Race in American Society

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Despite the election of Barack Obama as President of the United States, race remains one of the most divisive forces in U.S. society. While many of us struggle against racism, racial classification continues to affect where we live, where we work, and how we see ourselves. Racial classification affects our access to health care and our encounters with police officers. Distorted images of racial groups fill television and movie screens. Appeals to racism and fear of foreigners are dominant themes in elections to state and national offices. This course examines the formation and re-formation of racial classifications: how particular groups become racially identified, how these classifications change over time, and how conflicts over race have shaped American society. The meanings of race, as seen from a variety of perspectives, will be a consistent theme throughout the course.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt A,Diverse Perspectives

  • SOC-347 Immigration Law and Policy

    Prerequisites:

    Prerequisite: SOC 113 or SOC 116 OR Instructor's consent

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course examines U.S. Immigration legislation and policies, focusing on how and why various immigration laws and policies have been established and implemented throughout history. We will address the intersection between immigration policy and race, ethnicity, nationality and socioeconomic status, as well as explore the effects that immigration laws have had on various immigrant groups and society in general.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt A

  • SOC-327 Special Topics: General Sociology

English Language Requirements

TOEFL paper-based test score : 550 TOEFL iBT® test : 77

To study at this university, you have to speak English. We advice you to

take an IELTS test. More About IELTS

Requirements

We do not use specific minimums for scores or grades in the decision process, but weigh all factors together to gain a whole view of you and your potential for success as a Suffolk University student:

  • Level and range of high school courses selected
  • Grades achieved (official high school transcript with senior year grades)
  • SAT or ACT scores (our code is 3771)
  • Recommendations (two required; one from a guidance counselor, one from a teacher)
  • The essay
  • Other required forms
  • Admission interview (optional)
  • Transfer students should view the transfer requirements page for more details.

In high school, you should have completed:

  • Four units of English
  • Three units of mathematics (algebra I and II and geometry)
  • Two units of science (at least one with a lab)
  • Two units of language
  • One unit of American history
  • Four units distributed among other college preparatory electives

We may also consider other factors in the review process, such as:

  • Class rank
  • Honors courses
  • AP courses

We are also very interested in personal qualities that will offer us further insights into you as an applicant, including:

  • Admission interview
  • Extracurricular involvement
  • Community service
  • Special interests

Work Experience

No work experience is required.

Related Scholarships*

  • Academic Excellence Scholarship

    "The Academic Excellence Scholarship can provide up to a 50 % reduction in tuition per semester. These scholarships will be renewed if the student maintains superior academic performance during each semester of their 3-year Bachelor programme. The scholarship will be directly applied to the student’s tuition fees."

  • Alumni Study Travel Fund

    Scholarships for students who are already attending the University of Reading.

  • Amsterdam Merit Scholarships

    The University of Amsterdam aims to attract the world’s brightest students to its international classrooms. Outstanding students from outside the European Economic Area can apply for an Amsterdam Merit Scholarship.

* The scholarships shown on this page are suggestions first and foremost. They could be offered by other organisations than Suffolk University.

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